Editor: Bill Schwarz

Caribbean migration to Britain brought many new things—new music, new foods, new styles. It brought new ways of thinking too. This book explores the intellectual ideas that the West Indians brought with them to Britain. It shows that, for more than a century, West Indians living in Britain developed a dazzling intellectual critique of the codes of Imperial Britain. Chapters discuss the influence of, amongst others, C. L. R. James, Una Marson, George Lamming, Jean Rhys, Claude McKay and V. S. Naipaul. The contributors draw from many different disciplines to bring alive the thought and personalities of the figures they discuss, providing a picture of intellectual developments in Britain from which we can still learn much. The introduction argues that the recovery of this Caribbean past, on the home territory of Britain itself, reveals much about the prospects of multiracial Britain.

Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain
Winston James

I am… a social leper, a race outcast from an outcast class . (Claude McKay, 1921) The road to London I’ve a longin’ in me dept’s of heart dat I can conquer not, ’Tis a wish dat I’ve have been havin’ from since I could form a t’o’t, ’Tis to sail athwart the ocean

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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A theatre maker in every sense
Brian Singleton

Katharina highly unlikely. Hesketh Pearson remembered how Brayton was credited as much as her husband for the production’s success: Lily Brayton was incomparably the best Katharina of her time, and both of them jumped at a bound to the front of their profession. It was a breathless, knockabout, rampageous show, played on broadly farcical lines, and the audiences rocked with laughter. Wherever it was ­performed it raised the roof […] (Pearson, 1950: 66) Looking back on the production, Claude McKay wrote of how ‘the pair took London by storm’, and noted Brayton

in Stage women, 1900–50
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Laura Chrisman

anticolonial voices that includes J.J. Thomas, Sri Aurobindo, Joseph Casely Hayford, Claude McKay, Rabindranath Tagore and Sol Plaatje.9 I emphasise these elements and shifts in order to underscore my contention that postcolonial studies has always been a field of divergent orientations, and that Marxist and anti-colonial perspectives have acquired more popular currency than was theirs in the 1980s and early 1990s. But this is not to suggest that there is now no need for a collection of ‘contraventions’: the critical tendencies that I engage with in this book remain

in Postcolonial contraventions
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The Australian and New Zealand repertoires and fortunes of North American performers Margaret Anglin, Katherine Grey and Muriel Starr
Veronica Kelly

. Its publicity agent Claude McKay said of the Anglin tour that ‘[t]he theatre was comfortably filled throughout the season, but we were not turning crowds away’ (McKay, 1961: 110). Anglin’s group sailed to Australia from Vancouver on 23 May 1908 on the Aorangi, which was crammed with many other American performers. Aboard were the companies of the musical comedies The Red Mill and The Prince of Pilsen, plus fellow Irishwoman Ada Dwyer and other cast members of the rural comedy Mrs Wiggs of the Cabbage Patch. The Aorangi was not the only vessel of importance then upon

in Stage women, 1900–50
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Janelle Joseph

ones, and the importance of homosocial relationships. The cricket grounds then, like the seafaring communities of the twentieth century captured by Nassy Brown, Paul Gilroy and Claude McKay, are transnational communities whose “history is a verbal story, whose record lies in an oral and aural culture submerged beneath the national print cultures” (Stephens, 2005 , p. 183). The MCSC members, as

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

nostalgia may facilitate the kind of coherence, consistency, and sense of identity that each of us so desperately needs.” Even if migrants are unable to make a physical trip to their place of origin, they can access the homeland and the past through shared nostalgic memories. As Stephens ( 2005 ) writes of one of Claude McKay’s black diasporic literary characters, “community is enacted in the act of telling

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
Open Access (free)
Janelle Joseph

‘black home’ and its attendant values, domesticity and heterosexuality,” as Stephens ( 2005 , p. 146) writes of the black/Caribbean characters of Claude McKay’s novel, Home to Harlem . While I do not wish to reinforce a strict home = respectability/street = reputation divide – as there are examples of men and women in the MCSC who defy this binary – it is clear that among MCSC members the distinct

in Sport in the Black Atlantic