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Open Access (free)
Justin A. Joyce

Justin A. Joyce introduces the eighth volume of James Baldwin Review with a discussion of the US Supreme Court, the misdirected uproar over Critical Race Theory, a survey of canonical dystopian novels, and the symbolism of masking during COVID-19.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Troubling race, ethnicity, and masculinity in Beowulf
Catalin Taranu

centuries, especially with regard to how gender, race, and ethnic belonging are constructed. My chapter begins with two central premises: 1) we can detect anxieties related to masculinity, race, and ethnicity in the ways men behave in and read Beowulf , and 2) these anxieties are almost always interconnected in complex ways, so that our focus needs to be intersectional. This is why Critical Race theory (CRT) and Indigenous Studies can help us see that Beowulf could be read as relating to both the racialized Britons and Danes at different historical

in Dating Beowulf
The discomforts of empathy as white feminist affect
Andrea Lobb

for empathy – so long celebrated in Anglo-American feminism – no longer appears to be such a straightforward ethical or epistemic virtue when read through the double lens of affect and critical race theory. A fortiori, it loses, I suggest, its secure tenure as a feminist virtue. Drawing on the critical insights of cultural theorists of affect who take a special interest in empathy ( Pedwell

in Affective intimacies
Open Access (free)
Robin Norris

their experience, Beowulf imagines what he, a noble lord, would need in this situation: namely, the wealth that enables his power in life, and failing that, the glory enabled by death. This is false empathy, for he has made the mistake of thinking that he knows what his people want. 44 Delgado's work on empathy, false empathy, and the empathic fallacy is fundamental to Critical Race Theory, and helps to elucidate the emotional crux that is the end of the poem. 45 To

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

identity discourses on to somewhere which, by not sharing Britain's colonial history, also lacked Britain's insecurities about race, meant I did not even write down a citation. Scholarship by feminist and queer writers of colour, and campaigns to decentre Eurocentrism and whiteness at UK universities, would challenge me to rethink my past work on post-Yugoslav identities, as would listening on Twitter to a philosopher of critical race theory I had first followed for her disability activism, and trying to understand what I had meant when, teaching at

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Open Access (free)
Collaborations
Hannah Jones
,
Yasmin Gunaratnam
,
Gargi Bhattacharyya
,
William Davies
,
Sukhwant Dhaliwal
,
Emma Jackson
, and
Roiyah Saltus

M. Guigni and F. Passy (eds), Political Altruism? Solidarity Movements in International Perspective , Lanham, MD : Rowman and Littlefield , pp. 3–25 . Pulitano , P. ( 2013 ) ‘ In liberty's shadow: the discourse of refugees and asylum seekers in critical race theory and immigration law

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Catherine Baker

constitute today, a worldwide project, not limited to former imperial metropoles and lands they colonised. To accept, with Charles Mills ( 2015 : 223), that ‘white supremacy was global’ implies unambiguously that south-east Europe, like any other corner of the planet, has been affected by it and incorporated within it, even though a weight of economic and cultural evidence testifies to the region's peripheral and uncertain position within ‘Europe’ throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries' geopolitical reconfigurations. Critical race theory's ‘Europe’ is a

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Remi Joseph-Salisbury
and
Laura Connelly

. Regardless, we hope this manifesto distils some of the wisdom of those with whom we spoke as part of this research project. 1 A critical understanding of (anti-)racism Fundamental to the praxis of anti-racist scholar-activism must lie a critical understanding of racism. It seems obvious that we should comprehensively understand that which we seek to fight. After all, as the early proponent of Critical Race Theory Derrick Bell argues, ‘we can only delegitimate it if we can accurately pinpoint it’. 2 Despite its apparent

in Anti-racist scholar-activism
Open Access (free)
Daniel C. Remein
and
Erica Weaver

literary criticism termed ‘the intimate critique’ by Diane P. Freedman, Olivia Frey, and Frances Murphy Zauhar, 71 others examine intimacy itself as a guiding concept for the poem, drawing on Critical Race theory, animal studies, feminist and queer theory, affect theory, and Actor-Network theory, and taking a diversity of approaches ranging between and sometimes blending traditional philological analysis and more experimental modes. All explore the various intimacies imbricated in close reading and translation

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Bordering intimacy
Joe Turner

just as underanalysed in migration studies. Despite claims throughout the 1990s that we were increasingly living in a ‘borderless’ world, late liberal capitalism has instead produced a proliferation of borders (Mezzadra and Neilson 2013). We now have a complex understanding of how mobility is policed and governed in northern states (Walters 2006; Tazzioli 2014; Vaughan-Williams 2015; Jones 2016) but studies still struggle to draw upon postcolonial, decolonial and critical race theory to understand such trajectories (although see Bhambra 2017b; Mayblin 2017; Moffette

in Bordering intimacy