Open Access (free)
Moving beyond boundaries
Author: Dana Mills

Dance has always been a method of self- expression for human beings. This book examines the political power of dance and especially its transgressive potential. Focusing on readings of dance pioneers Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham, Gumboots dancers in the gold mines of South Africa, the One Billion Rising movement using dance to protest against gendered violence, dabkeh in Palestine and dance as protest against human rights abuse in Israel, the Sun Dance within the Native American Crow tribe, the book focuses on the political power of dance and moments in which dance transgresses politics articulated in words. Thus the book seeks ways in which reading political dance as interruption unsettles conceptions of politics and dance.

Open Access (free)
Dana Mills

99 6 Dancing human rights We have seen that ever since Isadora Duncan entered the stage of political dance, various instances of sic-​sensuous have been performed on the stage of the argument by bodies contracting into themselves and releasing to other bodies, moving and being moved. Those bodies affirm their equality to other bodies –​whether the dancing bodies they intervene against, or bodies inhabiting other worlds that deem them unequal. From Martha Graham’s audiences who are uninvited spectators to the gumboot dancers in South Africa and the flash mob

in Dance and politics
One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence
Dana Mills

83 5 Dancing the ruptured body: One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence I move the reader–​spectator to view the performance of a protest movement that calls on us to end violence against women through the power of dance. One Billion Rising, initiated by feminist author and activist Eve Ensler, calls for a global uprising on Valentine’s Day, utilising dance to protest against gendered violence. The impact of the movement has been far-​reaching and its scope ambitious. The site of the movement is the moving body upon which gendered violence is inscribed

in Dance and politics
Isadora Duncan’s danced revolution
Dana Mills

28 2 ‘I dreamed of a different dance’: Isadora Duncan’s danced revolution Modern dance innovator Isadora Duncan (1877–​ 1927) truly moved beyond boundaries, both choreographically and politically. Born in San Francisco, then dancing with Augustine Daly Dance Theatre in 1896, she moved from London to Paris to Berlin in quick succession, performing in salons and achieving success before the age of twenty. In 1905 she established her first school in Germany, aimed at children of all classes, and in 1914 she went to the US and transferred her school there. Duncan

in Dance and politics
Revolutionary nationalism and women’s representation in Ngugi wa Thiong’o
Elleke Boehmer

BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 42 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Jobs 2 ‘The master’s dance to the master’s voice’: revolutionary nationalism and women’s representation in Ngugi wa Thiong’o A writer needs people around him. . . . For me, in writing a novel, I love to hear the voices of the people . . . I need the vibrant voices of beautiful women: their touch, their sighs, their tears, their laughter. (Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Detained)1 With these affirmative words, the Kenyan writer Ngugi wa Thiong’o points to the strong position that women

in Stories of women
Writing on the body
Dana Mills

11 1 Moving beyond boundaries: writing on the body The book is written by many bodies who danced and inscribed their worlds upon the intersections between dance and politics. The argument is a three-​dimensional space bounded by three axes; in this chapter I elaborate, explore and problematise the three axes which demarcate the space of the argument. The ontology upon which the argument acts is twofold. On the one hand the argument is grounded in the dancing bodies of those subjects whose political intervention has written upon the argument. On the other hand

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
The dancer of the future dancing radical hope
Dana Mills

116 Conclusions: the dancer of the future dancing radical hope Dance plays a crucial role in Jonathan Lear’s seminal work on the Native American tribe, the Crow peoples, and their gains and losses in their attempt to sustain communal life under white conquest. Lear pays much attention to the sun dance, a prayer for revenge which lapsed around 1875 and was relearned around 1941, from the Crow’s enemies, the Shoshone tribe (Lear 2008). The sun dance was central to the Crow form of life, and intimately related to various other elements of their culture

in Dance and politics
Gumboot dance in South Africa
Dana Mills

66 4 ‘I want to tell them how I feel and how black people feel’: gumboot dance in South Africa Isadora Duncan’s rebelling body, dancing the chorus, was released into Martha Graham’s contracting chorus. But Duncan and Graham were not the first to mobilise choruses and their transgressive potential. I invite the reader–​spectator to watch gumboot dance in South Africa, which, as we will see, utilised many elements performed by Graham and Duncan in a radically different context. The body is able to intervene universally; and it does so beyond theatrical

in Dance and politics
An examination of touching moments in dance of court and courtship
Darren Royston

3 ‘Filthie groping and uncleane handlings’: an examination of touching moments in dance of court and courtship Darren Royston Accost, Sir Andrew, accost […] front her, board her, woo her, assail her! (Sir Toby Belch to Sir Andrew Aguecheek, upon meeting Maria; Twelfth Night, 1.3.46–54) When a person becomes aware of having physical, bodily contact with an external object, then the sense of touch creates a variety of specific feelings and sensations. When someone is physically linked to another person, a private communication channel can be established based on

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Open Access (free)
Fluidity and reciprocity in the performance of caring in Fevered Sleep’s Men & Girls Dance
Amanda Stuart Fisher

Writing about what could be interpreted as a starting point for Men & Girls Dance in the ‘newspaper’ accompanying the production, David Harradine, one of Fevered Sleep’s co-artistic directors, describes a moment at a local village bonfire, where he found himself watching a group of boys ‘chasing each other round in the rain and mud’ (Harradine, quoted in Fevered Sleep, 2017 ). As he stood watching the boys playing, he describes a growing sense of uneasiness as he realised that he too was being observed by the other adults present, who were positioning him as

in Performing care