Hysterical tetanus in the Victorian South Pacific
Daniel Simpson

In this chapter, Daniel Simpson delineates a complex model of imperial and cultural entanglement in the context of the death of the naval captain James Graham Goodenough under a hail of poisonous arrows on the Santa Cruz Islands in 1875. This was a moment in which previously vague British fears of the poisons of Santa Cruz were seemingly confirmed. However, the ship’s surgeon, Adam Brunton Messer, pointed to certain medical, cultural, and environmental factors that countered this popular hysteria. Superstitious dread of the reputed poisons of the region, Messer argued, had predisposed British sailors to a nervous irritability which either mimicked or encouraged the onset of tetanus. Furthermore, he insisted, endemic neurosis amongst sailors was responsible for the increasing prevalence of tetanus in the wounds of those struck by ostensibly poisonous arrows. Drawing upon new psychopathological understandings of the relations between mind and body, Messer effectively collapsed any distinctions between ‘civilised’ and ‘uncivilised’ peoples clashing in the South Pacific by imagining that modern medical education might work in both cases to supplant antiquated superstitions and anecdotal evidence. His medical hypotheses, deployed at a juncture of intense intercultural contact, served both to characterise and to realise a form of medical modernity.

in Progress and pathology
Daniel Klerman

Daniel Klerman 3 Was the jury ever self informing? Daniel Klerman1 For nearly two centuries, legal historians have believed that the medieval English jury differed fundamentally from the modern jury. Its members hailed from the immediate vicinity of the dispute and came to trial already informed about the facts. Jurors based their verdicts on information they actively gathered in anticipation of trial or which they learned by living in small, tight-knit communities where rumour, gossip, and local courts kept everyone informed about their neighbours’ affairs

in Judicial tribunals in England and Europe, 1200–1700
Open Access (free)
Conversations about the past in Restoration and eighteenth-century England
Daniel Woolf

6 Chapter 4 The spoken word Speaking of history Speaking of history: conversations about the past in Restoration and eighteenth-century England Daniel Woolf F or the past two or three centuries we have become rather used to thinking of history as something found in books. Just as we ourselves are trained to read and criticize documents, and to take these as the basis of all historical knowledge, so we tell our students which books to go off and read, what ‘authorities’ to rely on, which journals to consult, and so on. The advent of the Internet has changed

in The spoken word
James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the 1965 Cambridge Debate
Daniel Robert McClure

The 1965 debate at Cambridge University between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, Jr., posed the question: “Has the American Dream been achieved at the Expense of the American Negro?” Within the contours of the debate, Baldwin and Buckley wrestled with the ghosts of settler colonialism and slavery in a nation founded on freedom and equality. Framing the debate within the longue durée, this essay examines the deep cultural currents related to the American racial paradox at the height of the Civil Rights movement. Underscoring the changing language of white resistance against black civil rights, the essay argues that the Baldwin and Buckley debate anticipated the ways the U.S. would address racial inequality in the aftermath of the civil rights era and the dawn of neoliberalism in the 1970s.

James Baldwin Review
Christopher Z. Hobson

Written in the aftermath of the civil rights era’s expansive hopes, James Baldwin’s last novel, Just Above My Head (1979), examines a fundamental issue, the choice between hope and skepticism, or prophecy and doubt. Baldwin approaches this issue by questioning two cornerstone ideas of his fiction, the need for prophetic art and this art’s focus on anticipating a renovated society, often pictured in terms adapted from apocalyptic biblical texts and Gospel music lyrics. Just Above My Head is Baldwin’s fullest presentation of this kind of art and its linkage to apocalyptic hopes. He dramatizes these ideas in the art of his Gospel singer protagonist, particularly in a climactic scene of artistic dedication whose Gospel lyric envisions “tearing down the kingdom of this world.” Yet Baldwin also unsparingly questions these same ideas through plot and the blues-inflected skeptical-tragic consciousness of his narrator. Responding to a 1970s moment when hopes for transcendent justice seemed passé, Just Above My Head’s unique contribution is not to try to resolve the ideas it counterposes, but to face both the possible falseness of prophetic hope and our continuing need for it, and to present the necessity for choice in a final dream that holds the key to the novel’s meaning. In presenting this issue through a sustained double-voiced narrative that reexamines its author’s artistic practice and raises fundamental choices in outlook and conduct, Just Above My Head evidences the continuing artistic vitality of Baldwin’s late fiction.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
David M. Turner and Daniel Blackie

Workmen’s Advocate, no. 112, 22 April 1865. 13 Daniel Blackie, ‘Disability and Work during the Industrial Revolution in Britain’, in Michael Rembis, Catherine Kudlick and Kim E. Nielsen (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Disability History (New York: Oxford University Press, forthcoming). 14 Sarah F. Rose, ‘Work’, in Rachel Adams, Benjamin Reiss and David Serlin (eds), Keywords for Disability Studies (New York and London: New York University Press, 2015), 188. 15 For example, ‘Institution for Disabled Miners’, Cardiff and Merthyr Guardian, 18 February 1837. 16 Cf. Gordon

in Disability in the Industrial Revolution
Open Access (free)
Daniel C. Remein and Erica Weaver

intimacy itself is not, precisely, the point, and we do not cite them in any way as a catalogue of failures or offences. However, collectively, they do invite a fuller and more systematic assessment of intimacy as a critical term, both within each of these discourses, and as its own field for humanistic inquiry. Here, it is worth noting that all reading is an act of intimacy, since, as Daniel Boyarin notes, there is a ‘pervasive association of reading in the West with the private social spaces and meanings of the erotic’, as, for instance, when we read in bed

in Dating Beowulf
Open Access (free)
Adam Fox and Daniel Woolf

6 Chapter 1 Introduction Introduction Introduction Adam Fox and Daniel Woolf A s we enter the sixth millennium of recorded civilization, human beings have developed a superabundance of ways of communicating with each other. Some, such as writing, are several millennia old. Most have a much more recent vintage. Printing, the mechanical means whereby written symbols are reproduced in multiple identical copies, is barely five centuries old, despite some medieval and traditional Chinese precursors. The telegraph, invented in the nineteenth century, first

in The spoken word
Open Access (free)
David M. Turner and Daniel Blackie

. Although the scheme failed thanks to worker mistrust of their employers’ motives, by the 1820s a form of sick pay known as ‘smart money’ paid by employers to men certified incapable of work after accidents was becoming commonplace.34 The term echoed that used to describe payments to disabled naval personnel from the 100 DISABILITY IN THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION Chatham Chest, a mutual scheme established in 1588 jointly funded by the state and from deductions from seamen’s wages. Describing naval ‘smart money’, Daniel Defoe wrote that it was ‘honourable’ that a ‘Poor

in Disability in the Industrial Revolution
Open Access (free)
David M. Turner and Daniel Blackie

Thomson (ed.), Freakery, 11–12. 17 For example, Daniel Blackie, ‘Disabled Revolutionary War Veterans and 20 DISABILITY IN THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION the Construction of Disability in the Early United States, c. 1776–1840’ (unpublished PhD thesis, University of Helsinki, 2010), http://urn.fi/ URN:ISBN:978–952–10–6343–5, 109–40; Sarah F. Rose, No Right To Be Idle: The Invention Of Disability, 1840s–1930s (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2017); Halle Gayle Lewis, ‘“Cripples Are Not the Dependents One Is Led to Think”: Work and Disability in

in Disability in the Industrial Revolution