James Baldwin’s Just Above My Head
Jenny M. James

This article considers James Baldwin’s last published novel, Just Above My Head (1979), as the culmination of his exploration of kinship, reflecting on the ways distance and loss characterize African-American familial relations. By analyzing Baldwin’s representation of Hall Montana’s relationship to, and mourning of, his younger brother Arthur, this article argues that JAMH revises the terms of the black family to imagine an alternative, errant kinship that is adoptive, migratory, and sustained through songs of joy and grief. My approach to the novel’s portrayal of kinship is indebted to Édouard Glissant’s Poetics of Relation (1990), in which he defines “errantry” as a fundamental characteristic of diaspora that resists the claustrophobic, filial violence and territorial dispossession that are slavery’s legacies. Baldwin represents errant kinship in JAMH through his inclusion of music and formal experimentation. Departing from previous scholarship that reads JAMH as emblematic of the author’s artistic decline, I interpret the novel’s numerous syntactic and figurative experiments as offering new formal insight into his portrait of brotherly love. Baldwin’s integration of two distinctive leitmotifs, blood and song, is therefore read as a formal gesture toward a more capacious and migratory kinship.

James Baldwin Review
Hakim Khaldi

formed by the Syrian diaspora, endogenous solidarity significantly outweighs international relief efforts. Notes 1 Hakim Khaldi is an Arabic speaker who works in MSF’s Operations Department in Paris where his job is to monitor and analyse transnational armed conflicts. To this end, Khaldi takes part in negotiations and operations in the field in the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Baldwin, Racial Melancholy, and the Black Middle Ground
Peter Lurie

This article uses Baldwin’s 1949 essay “Everybody’s Protest Novel” to consider that literary mode’s corollary in the 1990s New Black Cinema. It argues that recent African American movies posit an alternative to the politics and aesthetics of films by a director such as Spike Lee, one that evinces a set of qualities Baldwin calls for in his essay about Black literature. Among these are what recent scholars such as Ann Anlin Cheng have called racial melancholy or what Kevin Quashie describes as Black “quiet,” as well as variations on Yogita Goyal’s diaspora romance. Films such as Barry Jenkins’s adaptation of If Beale Street Could Talk (2018) and Joe Talbot and Jimmy Fails’s The Last Black Man in San Francisco (2019) offer a cinematic version of racial narrative at odds with the protest tradition I associate with earlier Black directors, a newly resonant cinema that we might see as both a direct and an indirect legacy of Baldwin’s views on African American culture and politics.

James Baldwin Review
Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

non-intervention, and came to see that the (post)colonial run-up to genocide was a story of too much intervention, even in the name of democracy. During my doctoral research, I rediscovered the case of Somaliland. A self-declared independent republic in the north-western corner of Somalia, Somaliland had declined US and UN interventions at the beginning of the 1990s, apart from specific assistance (the clean-up of landmines, for example). Instead, it took care of its peace-building process internally and with its diaspora. Over the years, even

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector
Kevin O’Sullivan and Réiseal Ní Chéilleachair

Somali diaspora, was significant in that sense. It provided an alternative (and frequently highly critical) reading of the workshop’s quarter-century timeline and helped to link the historical element of our discussions directly to the future of the region. Given the open nature of the discussions and the sensitive nature of much of the material shared, it was also important that all participants were made aware of some ground rules

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Four Conversations with Canadian Communications Officers
Dominique Marshall

trusted relationships CRC volunteers had established with the family in the picture. Source : Canadian Red Cross. Dedicated to multicultural actions within the communities of Saskatchewan, MCoS works in a similar fashion with people in schools, refugee, diaspora, and Indigenous organizations of the province. One of its most powerful images – of a pile of folded garments accompanied by the slogan, ‘Only laundry should be separated by colour’ – came from an activity invented by teachers in a local school brainstorming about possible activities for Black History

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
1980–2000
Dominique Marshall

that it was ‘a combination of different kinds of stories – all based on true information’. It is also a tribute to the program’s openness that CIDA received feedback from Canadian children of the diaspora, of a nature they had not predicted. Several young readers asked the magazine editors to publish articles about their country of origins: ‘I come from Madagascar, which is the third largest island in the world. It is located in the Indian Ocean off the eastern coast of Mozambique. It is a tropical country. I am sending you my drawing about the problem of water in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Lewis Hine’s Photographs of Refugees for the American Red Cross, 1918–20
Sonya de Laat

to Belgian Refugees during the First World War ’ Immigrants & Minorities: Historical Studies in Ethnicity, Migration and Diaspora , 34 : 2 , 101 – 12 . Jenkinson , J. (ed.) ( 2018 ), Belgian Refugees in First World War Britain ( London : Routledge ). Kaplan , D. ( 1988 ), Lewis Hine in Europe: The Lost Photographs ( New York : Abbeville Press ). Kind-Kovács , F. ( 2016 ), ‘ The Great War, the Child's Body and the American Red Cross ’, European Review of History: Revue Européenne d'histoire , 7486 , March , 1

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Military Tactic or Collateral Damage?
Abdulkarim Ekzayez and Ammar Sabouni

the gap left by the withdrawal of the government’s Ministry of Health from non-government-controlled Syria ( Ekzayez, 2018 ). Concomitant with the formation of these governance structures locally, diaspora Syrian healthcare workers developed Syrian NGOs in response to the Syrian conflict. The Syrian American Medical Society (SAMS), Syrian Expatriate Medical Society (SEMA) and the Union of Medical Care and Relief Organizations (UOSSM), among other NGOs, shaped a substantial part of the international response to the Syrian conflict. International NGOs were able to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell, and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

et al. , 2010 : 15). Language and translation were important components of these ICT applications, and for relief efforts more broadly, since most international responders did not speak Creole or French. Thousands of Creole- and French-speaking volunteers – predominantly Haitian nationals and members of the Haitian diaspora – translated incoming SMS messages and telephone calls, which were then relayed to groups on the ground providing assistance and integrated into

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs