A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis, Luisa Enria, Sharon Abramowitz, Almudena-Mari Saez, and Sylvain Landry B. Faye

Introduction During the 2014 West African Ebola epidemic, an estimated US$ 10 billion was spent to contain the disease in the region and globally. The response brought together multilateral agencies, bilateral partnerships, private enterprises and foundations, local governments and communities. Social mobilisation efforts were pivotal components of the response architecture ( Gillespie et al. , 2016 ; Laverack and Manoncourt, 2015 ; Oxfam International, 2015

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

anecdotal examples that have been documented – and there is reason to think that the phenomenon is causing real and extensive harm. During the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, websites masquerading as news outlets published false stories about the causes and cures of the disease. In Nigeria, two people died and twenty were hospitalised after drinking excessive quantities of salt water, which they read would protect them from the disease ( Neporent, 2014 ). In the US, multiple websites published false news stories that contained alarmist

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction
Michaël Neuman, Fernando Espada, and Róisín Read

Most mainstream discourses on humanitarian security would not consider the community engagement of a team of anthropologists in three West African countries during the Ebola epidemic of 2014–16 as directly related to security – and their article in this special issue on ‘Security and Protection’ hardly touches on security as its own topic. Instead, it provides a detailed account of the need for a thorough understanding of social relationships when defining, and thus securing, humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

saviours and enabled by organisations that rely on public goodwill for funding and support’(page 49). She highlights that the risks of speaking out are compounded by racial hierarchies in the sector which mean some women are less likely to be believed. The recent investigative reporting by The New Humanitarian and the Thomson Reuters Foundation on the sexual abuse experienced by women in the Democratic Republic of Congo during the humanitarian response to the Ebola crisis has yet again illustrated

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

circumstances, and we have a large cadre of people trained in outbreaks of dangerous pathogens like Ebola and this kind of thing. They are all trained in how to protect themselves and how to treat patients in that environment. The overseas humanitarian work feeds right back into practices here. You also want is to build capacity, use your experience, and in many ways it is no more than that, because the people have skills; it is more a question of resources and finance, to support

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The Politics of ‘Proximity’ and Performing Humanitarianism in Eastern DRC
Myfanwy James

MSF sections work in the Petit Nord : France, Belgium and Holland, with their coordination offices based in Goma and Kinshasa. MSF is far from a homogenous movement: these different sections are autonomous and often have conflicting interpretations of MSF’s principles and of appropriate action in practice. This article focuses on projects based in Masisi, Rutshuru and Walikale, from their inception in the early 2000s: the MSF sections support health facilities, respond to cyclical epidemics of measles, malaria, cholera and Ebola, treat wounded combatants and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

both the need to be ‘where it’s happening’ (whether a refugee camp, the scene of killings or an Ebola treatment centre) and the need to limit the financial cost of such travel. Access problems are not unique to the DRC. ‘If, as a journalist, I want to know more of what is going on inside Angola or Sudan – because I smell a good story – I have no alternative but to draw on the resources of an aid organisation involved,’ noted William F. (Bill) Deedes, a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Framework for Measuring Effectiveness in Humanitarian Response
Vincenzo Bollettino and Birthe Anders

–military engagement in the 2010 floods in Pakistan, Madiwale and Virk (2011) find that national militaries are frequently first responders in disasters, rather than only supplementing civilian responses. Forestier, Cox and Horne (2016) provide an analysis of civil–military coordination in the 2014–16 Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone and draw an overall positive picture of coordination, which can in part be explained by military and humanitarian responders having closely aligned goals in that response. This is one of the few publications that is explicit about positive outcomes of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian Innovation
Gerard Finnigan and Otto Farkas

explore the potential of and flaws in innovative interventions, or to create radical programmatic solutions, which, despite their uniqueness, adhere to strict programme ethical standards. One recent example of such a breakthrough occurred with the emergency response to the Ebola crisis and the development of a vaccine against the Zaire ebolavirus and implementation of a vaccination programme. The vaccine was developed within a fractional time envelope and administered

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

disaster and conflict must be halted as soon as possible, and the path to redemption – to, as far as possible, re-establishing normal service – comes through showing all of those looking on that the catastrophe has been contained . It is a kind of quarantine effect, whereby what frightens observers is the idea of uncontrolled, ongoing, unpredictable suffering. Humanitarians arrive to create a moment of ‘new normal’ where the flow has been stemmed, the hole plugged. The Ebola response is an example of this – the vast cost in life and suffering and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs