Open Access (free)
Ford Madox Ford, the novel and the Great War
Author: Sara Haslam

This book is about Ford Madox Ford, a hero of the modernist literary revolution. Ford is a fascinating and fundamental figure of the time; not only because, as a friend and critic of Ezra Pound and Joseph Conrad, editor of the English Review and author of The Good Soldier, he shaped the development of literary modernism. But, as the grandson of Ford Madox Brown and son of a German music critic, he also manifested formative links with mainland European culture and the visual arts. In Ford there is the chance to explore continuity in artistic life at the turn of the last century, as well as the more commonly identified pattern of crisis in the time. The argument throughout the book is that modernism possesses more than one face. Setting Ford in his cultural and historical context, the opening chapter debates the concept of fragmentation in modernism; later chapters discuss the notion of the personal narrative, and war writing. Ford's literary technique is studied comparatively and plot summaries of his major books (The Good Soldier and Parade's End) are provided, as is a brief biography.

Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

of the English Review, author of The Good Soldier and transformer of Ezra Pound’s verse, he performed a vital part. Indeed, Max Saunders writes in his magisterial biography of Ford that ‘the period of literary modernism is “the Ford era” as much as it is Pound’s, or T. S. Eliot’s, or Joyce’s’; Ford was ‘at the centre of the three most innovative groups of writers this century’.4 In addition, the language of decline, collapse and fragmentation is commonly applied by historical analysts to events and developments of the early twentieth century. These were the years

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

modernism, of multiple truths; the primacy of change. The relationship between Ford and Lawrence at times was close, and at times was difficult. It began when Ford first published Lawrence in the English Review and ‘introduced him to literary London’.3 Later Ford remembered reading ‘Odour of Chrysanthemums’ and discovering ‘another genius’, and, though he didn’t want to publish The White Peacock (Lawrence’s first novel) in the Review, he sent it with a recommendation to Heinemann, who published it in 1911.4 Here, Lawrence’s thoughts are a useful way into Ford, his prose

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

, Conclusion 227 this interruption was seen as the herald of positive change, and this was to be celebrated rather than condemned. In September 1914, the English Review trumpeted that ‘This war will be the great clearing house of civilisation.’11 Despite the Manchester Guardian’s warning to all those who had talked of the coming of war as ‘a moral purge’ or ‘a tonic’, Edmund Gosse, in an article entitled ‘War and Literature’, described the conflict as, ‘the sovereign disinfectant . . . the Condy’s Fluid that cleans out the stagnant pools and clotted channels of the

in A war of individuals
Sara Haslam

in previous chapters, but Ford’s critical brain will be seen to provide some more ideas. As part of an immediate answer to the question posed above, I want first to make a brief digression to consider Ford’s role as an editor of modernist writing. This will help to provide a useful context for later discussion, as it was in his role as editor of the English Review from 1908 that some of his critical ideas were put into practice. As Nora Tomlinson writes of this period, ‘Ford’s capacity to recognise and endorse new ideas, his openness to new forms of writing is

in Fragmenting modernism
Christine E. Hallett

, BJN (30 September 1916): 269. 46 Conway, Mary Borden: 53–5. 47 On her meeting with Louis Spears, see:  Borden, Journey down a Blind Alley: 9. See also: Conway, Mary Borden: 65. 48 See the report in BJN: Anon., ‘Croix de Guerre for Sister Jaffray’, BJN (16 June 1917): 416. 49 Conway, Mary Borden: 71–3, 89. 50 Several sections of the book appeared in The English Review in August 1917: Mary Borden-Turner, ‘At the Somme’, The English Review (August 1917): 97–102. On Mary Borden’s writing in The Forbidden Zone, see:  Hutchison, ‘The Theater of Pain’; Margaret Higonnet

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

culture’ into the UK through hip-hop music, but also localised genres such as garage, drill and so on. 160 Bordering intimacy 3 Black and Asian people make up 26 per cent of the prison population in England and Wales but only represent 13  per  cent of the general population (Sturge 2018: 4). 4 Easy Meat is published by English Review Press, a subsidiary of the World Encounter Institute, which works to propagate a project of white supremacy through a blog series and book press. It does so through claims to protect ‘Western civilisation’, which is often limited to

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

: ‘Upon Rossetti’s death, his inverness descended to my grand-father. Upon my grand-father’s death it descended to me, it being twenty-three years old. I wore it with feelings of immense pride as if it had been – and indeed was it not – the mantle of a prophet’ (p. 128). Violet Hunt talks of Ford’s and Conrad’s stylistic similarities to the Pre-Raphaelite aesthetic, and remarks on the extent of ‘Pre-Raphaelite paraphernalia’ at the English Review office. On a very different matter, she describes his marriage proposal to her as ‘an assay in Pre-Raphaelite crudity of

in Fragmenting modernism