Search results

Insights from 'Africa's World War'

Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making addresses debates on liberal peace and the policies of peacebuilding through a theoretical and empirical study of resistance in peacebuilding contexts. Examining the case of ‘Africa’s World War’ in the DRC, it locates resistance in the experiences of war, peacebuilding and state-making by exploring discourses, violence and everyday forms of survival as acts that attempt to challenge or mitigate such experiences. The analysis of resistance offers a possibility to bring the historical and sociological aspects of both peacebuilding and the case of the DRC, providing new nuanced understanding of these processes and the particular case.

A view from below
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

2 Patterns and practices of everyday resistance: a view from below T What is everyday resistance? he informalities, ambiguities and contradictions that peacebuilding runs into reflect the political nature of the process. These become visible when examined from the everyday practices of the actors involved. In IR the everyday has become synonymous with the makings of actual subjects in their most quotidian roles (Autesserre 2014; Hobson and Seabrooke 2007; Mitchell 2011b; Neumann 2002). This is not so much a new field of study, as it represents a common call

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

7 Everyday resistance and everyday order in world politics D espite the increasing involvement of peacebuilding strategies in spheres of sovereign authority after the Cold War, and despite the fact that these strategies aim to reconstitute state authority, peacebuilding continues to be thought of as external to the conflicts and violent dynamics it addresses. The critical peace and conflict studies literature has challenged this vision, but in trying to understand the power dynamics in peacebuilding processes it has reified a binary vision by analysing these

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

arena of freedom, it provides a safer audience among relative equals.2 The public transcript has several functions, including: concealment (hiding the nasty aspects 107 Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making of power and elites’ disagreement), unanimity (giving a sense of agreement between elites and non-elites and denying dissent), euphemism and stigma (beautifying power and uglifying dissent) and public parade (dramatising the grandeur of power) (Scott 1990: 45–66). These functions are visible in that peacebuilding’s claim to authority is done by

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Open Access (free)
Resistance and the liberal peace: a missing link
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

economic goods, including decision-making power, privileges, rights and access to material resources, is established. This process both continues and changes the distributing mechanisms that were in place before the conflict started. Peacebuilding is therefore a process that is constituted and resisted by the multiple actors involved. However, it has been studied much more as an instrument of power and order than as a process that is resisted. 1 Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making The liberal peace debates have produced a body of critical research that

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

Nzinga Panju was opposed to Portuguese occupation in his kingdom; in 1682, the prophet Chimpa Vita resisted against the implantation of foreign power in the kingdom of Kongo, she was burnt alive. In 1942, in the kingdom of the Bahunde, where the Bakumu live, in Masisi, in one of the hunters’ villages, in Ntoto, Mandayi told Sindikiza that his brother Yusufu Kitawala in the cultural struggle against foreign 127 Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making occupation had a formula that protected men against all attacks from bladed or fire weapons by the enemy

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making Zairian state ‘a congeries of organized repositories of administrative, coercive, and ideological power subject to, and engaged in, an ongoing process of power accumulation characterized by uneven ascension and uneven decline’ (1991: 142). It also made state power relative, that is, ‘weak to international donors intent on implementing reforms, but massive and overwhelming to the citizenry’ (Schatzberg 1991: 142). Neither the colonial Bula Matari and its trinity of state, Church and corporation, nor its post

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

the concept better, 153 Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making Figure 6.1 is also illustrative of the ways in which creativity provides everyday needs.5 It is a broom made from needle-like palm leaves held together by a tomato can. The making of this broom is the fruit of a myriad of monetary, symbolic and reciprocal exchanges. The final product is testimony to how Congolese creativity facilitates survival and that this is a collective project.6 This creativity is applied to the delivery of all sorts of services (food security, health, education

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

have generally been studied under a global governance framework. The very few historical-sociological approaches demonstrate that little is known about how the reconstruction of state authority impacts on peacebuilding (Bliesemann de Guevara 2012, 2015; Jung 2008; Migdal and Schlichte 2005). As Newman argues, 25 Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making In historical perspective statebuilding has generally been a coercive and often a violent process. Statebuilding involves imposing a unified, centralised state and subjugating peripheral regions, securing

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Joanna Gore

? 149 health system education is on the increase, with inmates encouraged, coerced, threatened and sometimes blackmailed into taking part in rehabilitation activities where they are to ‘learn’ how to function in society as ‘normal’ people. Due to similarities in structure and function of the institutions, shared forms of everyday resistance also emerge. Here a comparison with Scott’s (1985) work on everyday forms of resistance by ‘peasant’ communities is useful. In order to be effective and avoid severe repercussions by landowners, resistance by peasant activists has

in Changing anarchism