Open Access (free)
Author: Peter Morey

Rohinton Mistry is the only author whose every novel has been shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize. Such a Long Journey (1991), A Fine Balance (1995) and Family Matters (2002) are all set in India's Parsee community. Recognised as one of the most important contemporary writers of postcolonial literature, Mistry's subtle yet powerful narratives engross general readers, excite critical acclaim and form staple elements of literature courses across the world. This study provides an insight into the key features of Mistry's work. It suggests how the author's writing can be read in terms of recent Indian political history, his native Zoroastrian culture and ethos, and the experience of migration, which now sees him living in Canada. The texts are viewed through the lens of diaspora and minority discourse theories to show how Mistry's writing is illustrative of marginal positions in relation to sanctioned national identities. In addition, Mistry utilises and blends the conventions of oral storytelling common to the Persian and South Asian traditions, with nods in the direction of the canonical figures of modern European literature, sometimes reworking and reinflecting their registers and preoccupations to create a distinctive voice redolent of the hybrid inheritance of Parsee culture and of the postcolonial predicament more generally.

Open Access (free)
Corruption, community and duty in Family Matters
Peter Morey

Family Matters 125 5 Running repairs: corruption, community and duty in Family Matters it is their characters, indeed, that make people what they are, but it is by reason of their actions that they are happy or the reverse. (Aristotle, Poetics, Book 6) O The world as evil let us not resign, But be good whilst to good we still incline. Nor good nor bad forever will remain; Let us in memory the good retain. (The Shah-Namah of Fardusi, trans. Alexander Rogers, p. 60) N 6 December 1992, the Babri Mosque at Ayodhya was destroyed by a large crowd of Hindu

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

International man of stories
Peter Morey

:16 pm 172 Rohinton Mistry of that documentary realism sometimes seen as symptomatic of the author’s writing. It also uses a variety of literary tropes and discourses as it weaves its narrative fabric, creating a quilt which sustains and supports both characters and readers as they experience the giddy fluctuations of a menacing, topsy-turvy world. Even in the ostensibly more traditional Family Matters, similar issues of corruption versus integrity are explored. Here, notions of the multiple and sometimes conflicting demands of duty are set alongside filial loyalty

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

believable interior life.’22 Other legitimate criticisms include the charge of a tendency to sentimentality. In a review of Family Matters, Adam MarsJones comments that the novel ‘moves to a close on a surge of pious sentiment’, and accuses Mistry of differentiating between the ‘significant’ and ‘arbitrary’ fates of his characters according to whether or not they are Parsis: a charge which is perhaps a little harsh yet understandable in a text with a more intrinsic focus than the previous, expansive tour de force.23 It is certainly the case that the fountain of domestic

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

– Such a Long Journey (1991), A Fine Balance (1995), and Family Matters (2002), receive a host of literary prizes, and achieve recognition as one of the most important contemporary writers of postcolonial literature. Mistry draws his inspiration both from sharply recalled childhood experiences and from the upheavals of migration. However, as always with such intense and apparently personal narratives, the relationship between fiction and autobiography is hard to determine. Certainly there are overlaps between the events and life choices of the writer and some of his

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Pasts and presents
Joe Turner

personhood of people of colour living in postcolonial northern states like Britain. Conclusion 245 This points to the powerful way that family makes and unmakes. Dominant claims to family can work to organise who is excluded, abandoned and killed, but also those who need to be protected. Family here can produce bodies and relations that can be empathised with, addressed and cared for in ways that demand sustenance and protection (from the state and related authorities). In the example of grooming, what becomes apparent is how much the whiteness of the family matters

in Bordering intimacy
The structures of migration in Tales from Firozsha Baag
Peter Morey

foreshadow of Family Matters, the straitened Bulsaras keep envelopes of carefully saved money for essential items – but this is, in fact, just one of a series of reasons she rehearses for refusing to relinquish her hold over her son. As Behroze observes, the apron string by which Jehangir is tied is far more visible than the kusti cord he wears as a mark of his Zoroastrianism. Their relationship is an extreme example of what Luhrmann calls the ‘double-bind’ of the Parsi mother-son relationship, where the mother’s attentions are perceived as powerful and stultifying: ‘The

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Bordering intimacy
Joe Turner

versa), family can also work as a site of powerful contestation and struggle. Because it has social and political power, claims to protect family can be used to make rights claims, to contest imperial repression and dehumanising violence (for ‘home’ and resistance see hooks 1999; Beckles-Raymond 2019; and also Turner 2016). In such struggles, a claim to family may rehumanise subjects by appealing to the dominant frame that ‘family matters’. An example of this might be campaigns to stop the incarceration of irregularised migrant families and in particular children in

in Bordering intimacy
‘Locals’ and ‘Moroccans’ in the Sainte-Foy-Bordeaux vineyards
Chantal Crenn

through skilled work on the vines, ‘to let them down’ is experienced as a way of organising their time to their advantage (e.g. family matters, doctor’s appointment) or as a weapon against the powers of work organisation. Finally, to be absent is experienced by some as a way to go on strike individually, because ever more frequent compulsory free time conveys to them their uselessness. They live the paradox of ‘the unemployed immigrant’, who cannot go back home without having succeeded, yet can no longer justify his presence in front of the majority of the immigrant

in Alternative countrysides