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Gender, sexuality and transgression
Author: Jenny DiPlacidi

This book demonstrates that incest was representative of a range of interests crucial to writers of the Gothic, often women or homosexual men who adopted a critical stance in relation to the heteronormative patriarchal world. In repositioning the Gothic, representations of incest are revealed as synonymous with the Gothic as a whole. The book argues that extending the traditional endpoint of the Gothic makes it possible to understand the full range of familial, legal, marital, sexual and class implications associated with the genre's deployment of incest. Gothic authors deploy the generic convention of incest to reveal as inadequate heteronormative ideologies of sexuality and desire in the patriarchal social structure that render its laws and requirements arbitrary. The book examines the various familial ties and incestuous relationships in the Gothic to show how they depict and disrupt contemporary definitions of gender, family and desire. Many of the methodologies adopted in Gothic scholarship and analyses of incest reveal ongoing continuities between their assumptions and those of the very ideologies Gothic authors strove to disrupt through their use of the incest trope. Methodologies such as Freudian psychoanalysis, as Botting argues, can be positioned as a product of Gothic monster-making, showing the effect of Gothic conventions on psychoanalytic theories that are still in wide use today.

Sawdust and Tinsel and Dreams
Dan Williams

patient or individual alongside an exploration of their past. Klein thus emphasized the ‘epistemophilic instinct’—the desire for knowledge of external reality as a key factor alongside the other instincts identified in classical Freudian psychoanalysis. 6 Specifically from a Kleinian perspective, we might note in The Phantom Carriage the combination of a style directed towards enhanced realism in the use of depth of field for background detail and the representation of a psychic reality of splitting and internal

in Ingmar Bergman
Open Access (free)
Mother–daughter relations in Paule Constant’s fiction
Gill Rye

tyrannical father, and, on the other, to a change of language and culture. The key point that connects Kristeva’s patients with Constant’s character Chrétienne is that this blank is a symptom of trauma.  Aurore’s highly connotative surname, Amer, itself indicates this trajectory: à-mère (to-mother).  See, in particular, Melanie Klein, Love, Guilt and Reparation and Other Works – (London: Virago, ). Klein’s concept of ‘phantasy’ is involved here. Different from ‘fantasy’, which in Freudian psychoanalysis is the expression or staging of unconscious desire

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

methodologies adopted in Gothic scholarship and analyses of incest reveal ongoing continuities between their assumptions and those of the very ideologies Gothic authors strove to disrupt through their use of the incest trope. Methodologies such as Freudian psychoanalysis, as Botting argues, can be positioned as a product of Gothic monster-making, showing the effect of Gothic conventions on psychoanalytic theories that

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Beckett and anxiety
Russell Smith

object’, nevertheless insists on it as ‘the central affect, the one around which everything is organised’. Lacan, The Other Side, p. 144. Indeed Lacan’s Seminar X is dedicated entirely to anxiety, bearing the French title L’Angoisse. Ngai, Ugly Feelings, p. 210. It’s nothing 211 55 Ibid., p. 216. 56 Jonathan Lear, Love and Its Place in Nature: A Philosophical Interpretation of Freudian Psychoanalysis (New York: Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 1990). 57 Sue Campbell, Interpreting the Personal: Expression and the Formation of Feelings (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press

in Beckett and nothing
The lump-child and its parents in The King of Tars
Jane Gilbert

particular, provide an analytical tool for understanding the complex construction of and the anxieties about paternity which ring through these medieval texts.15 Like many medieval works, they pose the question which, according to Lacan, is the great question of MUP_McDonald_06_Ch5 106 11/20/03, 14:24 The King of Tars 107 16 Freudian psychoanalysis: ‘what does it mean to be a father?’ For Lacan, the distinctive paternal task is above all a matter of rendering humans distinct from animals, especially by regulating sexuality: The primordial Law is … that which in

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
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Balance, malleability and anthropology: historical contexts
Chris Millard

/anthropology are also legion. Rivers is another reference point here, heavily influenced by Freudian psychoanalysis and the practice of anthropology. At the end of his enormously influential history of European human sciences, The Order of Things , Michel Foucault argues that: we can understand why psychoanalysis and ethnology should have been constituted in confrontation, in a fundamental correlation: since [Freud's 1913 work] Totem and Taboo , the establishment of a common field for these two, the

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Perceiving, describing and modelling child development
Bonnie Evans

deliberately pinned against the first wave of theories of the infantile unconscious that had been framed around Freudian psychoanalysis. If one were to simplify this, one could say that this is a story about how psychoanalysts were proved wrong. But the story is far more complicated, as the new epidemiological autism psychologists did not prove psychoanalysts wrong but instead did something far more insidious

in The metamorphosis of autism
Alison Lewis

unconscious; consequently, his eyes were opened to the implications of cases of violent crime for the collective psyche of the masses. The Institute was the point of departure for many pioneers of political psychology who strove to incorporate Marxist philosophy and social theory into psychoanalysis.97 Although he never turned his back on Freudian psychoanalysis, like fellow members of the Berlin Psycho­ analytic Institute, by the end of the 1920s Döblin increasingly questioned why Freud was not more concerned with the societal dimensions of his fragile, isolated ego.98

in A history of the case study
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

which women are oppressed … the sexism in the tradition of which they are a part tends to be dragged in with each borrowing’. 13 In spite of what Rubin describes as the misogynistic tradition underlying these modes of analysis that has led to a feminist re-evaluation of Freudian psychoanalysis and Lévi-Strauss’s structural anthropology, these are still privileged approaches in analyses of

in Gothic incest