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This collection interrogates the representation of humanitarian crisis and catastrophe, and the refraction of humanitarian intervention and action, from the mid-twentieth century to the present, across a diverse range of media forms: traditional and contemporary screen media (film, television and online video) as well as newspapers, memoirs, music festivals and social media platforms (such as Facebook, YouTube and Flickr). The book thus explores the historical, cultural and political contexts that have shaped the mediation of humanitarian relationships since the middle of the twentieth century. Together, the chapters illustrate the continuities and connections, as well as the differences, which have characterised the mediatisation of both states of emergency and acts of amelioration. The authors reveal and explore the significant synergies between the humanitarian enterprise, the endeavour to alleviate the suffering of particular groups, and media representations, and their modes of addressing and appealing to specific publics. The chapters consider the ways in which media texts, technologies and practices reflect and shape the shifting moral, political, ethical, rhetorical, ideological and material dimensions of international humanitarian emergency and intervention, and have become integral to the changing relationships between organisations, institutions, governments, individual actors and entire sectors.

Laura Suski

’ children by purchasing environmentally friendly products, or we might act against child labour practices in ‘distant’ nations by purchasing garments manufactured by particular companies. These practices raise several questions of a global humanitarianism for children. Can the intent to protect ‘our’ children extend to a more universalised impulse to protect ‘other’, more distant children? What are the limitations of

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

disillusioned with the truncated horizons of the New Left and resigned to the triumph, for a generation or two, of welfare capitalism ( Meiksins Wood, 1995 ). Before this, global humanitarianism had been a largely religious exercise, an extension of Christian ministry ( Barnett, 2011 ), while human rights barely registered on the world stage ( Moyn, 2010 ). From the 1970s on, the humanist international became a place where disillusioned rebels could continue to work, albeit in a new idiom, for those who suffered. They ceased working to any great extent on their

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read

, 44 – 62 , doi: 10.1080/14616742.2011.534661 . Taithe , B. ( 2020 ), ‘ Humanitarian Masculinity, Desire, Character and Heroics ’, in E. Möller , J. Paulmann and K. Stornig (eds), Gendering Global Humanitarianism in the Twentieth Century Practice

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

), ‘ Global Humanitarianism and the Changing Aid-Media Field: Everyone Was Dying for Footage ’, Journalism Studies 8 : 6 , 862 – 78 . Curtis , H. ( 2015 ), ‘ Picturing Pain Evangelicals and the Politics of Pictorial Humanitarianism in an Imperial Age ’, in Fehrenbach , H. and Rodongo , D. (eds), Humanitarian Photography: A History ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press ), pp. 22 – 46 . Davies , N. ( 2008 ), Flat Earth News ( London : Vintage Books

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Michael Lawrence and Rachel Tavernor

such as Jonathan Benthall and Kevin Rozario suggest that global humanitarianism acquired its distinctive contemporary ethos and form in the West with the founding of the International Committee of the Red Cross in 1863, and subsequently with the work of the American Red Cross during the First World War. 8 However, humanitarianism underwent a significant shift in the aftermath of the Second World War. Craig Calhoun, for example, claims the civilian

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Open Access (free)
Television and the politics of British humanitarianism
Andrew Jones

the NGOs represented on the DEC, which consolidated the latter as the most influential actors in their sector. The perception of the film as a new phenomenon in broadcasting also foreshadowed what would become a familiar trend in global humanitarianism, of single television news bulletins or programmes galvanising massive international public responses. This reality was not lost on the largest aid agencies, and it

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Toby Fricker

work by aid agencies and their close relationship with journalists. Simon Cottle and David Nolan claim that, ‘These developments imperil the very ethics and project of global humanitarianism that aid agencies historically have done so much to promote’. 10 Glenda Cooper also questions the editorial integrity of journalists working with aid agencies: ‘While journalists – if sometimes imperfectly – work on the principle of

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Jenny Edkins

: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011: 242. 13 Amanda B. Moniz, From Empire to Humanity: The American Revolution and the Origins of Humanitarianism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016: 2. 14 Caroline Shaw, Britannia’s Embrace: Modern Humanitarianism and the Imperial Origins of Refugee Relief. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015: 5–6. 15 Peter Stamatov, The Origins of Global Humanitarianism: Religion, Empires and Advocacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. 16 Rieff, A Bed for the Night, 111. 17 Jenny Edkins, Whose Hunger? Concepts of Famine

in Change and the politics of certainty