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This handbook is written for patients and members of the public who want to understand more about the approaches, methods and language used by health-services researchers. Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research is now a requirement of most major health-research programmes, and this book is designed to equip these individuals with the knowledge and skills necessary for meaningful participation. Edited by award-winning mental-health researchers, the book has been produced in partnership with mental-health-service users and carers with experience of research involvement. It includes personal reflections from these individuals alongside detailed information on quantitative, qualitative and health-economics research methods, and comprehensively covers all the basics needed for large-scale health research projects: systematic reviews; research design and analysis using both qualitative and quantitative approaches; health economics; research ethics; impact and dissemination. This book was developed during a five-year research programme funded by the UK’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) called Enhancing the Quality of User Involved Care Planning in Mental Health Services (EQUIP). The handbook clearly outlines research practices, and gives an insight into how public and patient representatives can be involved in them and shape decisions. Each chapter ends with a reflective exercise, and there are also some suggested sources of additional reading. People who get involved in health research as experts from experience now have a textbook to support their research involvement journey.

researcher positioning (Brooks et al., 2016): A Research Handbook for Patient and Public Involvement Researchers Trustworthiness of data and analysis HB and KR are health service researchers, SW is a Lecturer in Mental Health, KL is a Professor in Mental Health and AR is a Professor of Health Systems Implementation. As such, researchers had no therapeutic relationship with participants. The conceptual starting point of our study is one informed by a capabilities approach which recognises that social context and engagement with valued people, places and activities are

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers

find themselves using in health services research: • In-depth interviews • Focus groups • Observations Service-user and carer involvement in qualitative research methods Interviews Qualitative in-depth interviews are useful for illuminating a range of perspectives from different types of participants. The types of qualitative interviews are illustrated in Figure 19. Figure 19 Types of qualitative interview Highly structured interviews - often with set response options, similar to a spoken questionnaire Semi-structured interviews - consisting of a range of

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers

public representatives engage in health services research and work meaningfully with academic and clinical research teams in true partnership. It has been co-written with service users and carers from the NIHR EQUIP research programme and aims to help other public and patient representatives increase their understanding and skills in research methods. Health research is incredibly important. It helps to develop and evaluate new treatments, improve patient safety, and identify the most effective ways to organize, manage, finance, and deliver high quality care. As a

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers

experiences, we can travel a long way towards improving the care that we receive. We asked people to talk about their positive experiences, what has worked well for them and also what could be improved. We gathered a great deal of information that has been to the EQUIP A Research Handbook for Patient and Public Involvement Researchers Garry’s story Reflective exercise opportunities are there for members of • What the public to get involved in health services research? there any stages of the research process • Are that are of particular interest to you? Why? • What

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers

improve their administration, and some GPs had even sought to explore general practice in terms of management theory. 114 Developments within British medical discourse and practice were also of importance. Psychologically oriented theories emerging in the late 1950s emphasised professional fallibility and reflexivity, whilst the NHS's close connection with research saw major figures in British clinical and health services research promote techniques of review as central to efficiency and efficacy. 115 In fact, some doctors saw diabetes as a site

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
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Conceptual and ethodological challenges for comparative analysis

in Iranian Muslim University students’, Journal of Happiness Studies, 12:1, 105–13. Kalleberg, A. L. and Vaisey, S. (2005), ‘Pathways to a good job’, British Journal of Industrial Relations, 43:3, 431–54. Kamerāde, D. (2009), ‘Part-time work and involvement in voluntary associations in Britain’, Sociological Research Online, 14:5, 2. Karasek, R. and Theorell, T. (1990), Healthy work (New York: Basic Books). Krueger, P., Brazil, K., Lohfeld, L., Edward, H. G., Lewis, D. and Tjam, E. (2002), ‘Organization specific predictors of job satisfaction’, BMC Health Services

in Making work more equal
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professionalism? And what do more recent developments indicate about the shifting relationship between professionals and the state? As the foregoing history of diabetes management shows, medical professionals in Britain were rarely united in the post-war period, and new forms of activity embodied in chronic disease care and professional management were contested. Like those in the USA, British academic clinicians and health service researchers, although often involved with teaching hospitals, assumed new managerial roles over medical practice when creating

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine

ultimately hollow because of the concessions made to form the NHS. Already in the 1950s, central departments wanted to exercise some control over service expenditure, even if this infringed upon clinical decision-making. 49 Considerations of costs were shared by some elite GPs and emergent health service researchers, who progressively problematised variations in prescribing and speculated about accountability for resource use. 50 Nonetheless, the NHS had been founded on an informal agreement that doctors would have considerable autonomy of action within set budgets. 51

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine

publications and projects on retinopathy and its detection and treatment. 96 Foulds's paper, however, was the first substantive piece of work seen by officials that drew together large-scale investigation of prevalence and incidence with costed comparisons of tests, screening staff, and equipment. 97 One medical civil servant who received the paper even suggested that it was ‘one of the most exciting [papers] in practical terms I have seen in some time’ and exactly ‘the sort of health services research we need more of’. 98 To some extent, the paper

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine