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Cultural readings of race, imperialism and transnationalism
Author: Laura Chrisman

This book analyses black Atlantic studies, colonial discourse analysis and postcolonial theory, providing paradigms for understanding imperial literature, Englishness and black transnationalism. Its concerns range from the metropolitan centre of Conrad's Heart of Darkness to fatherhood in Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk; from the marketing of South African literature to cosmopolitanism in Achebe; and from utopian discourse in Parry to Jameson's theorisation of empire.

Mel Bunce

, M. ( 2017 ), ‘ Social Media and Fake News in the 2016 Election ’, Journal of Economic Perspectives , 31 : 2 , 211 – 36 . Aly , H. ( 2017 ), ‘ Media Perspectives: A Means to an End? Creating a Market for Humanitarian News from Africa ’, in Bunce , M. , Franks , S. and Paterson , C. (eds), Africa’s Media Image in the 21st Century: From the ‘Heart of Darkness’ to ‘Africa Rising’ ( London : Routledge ), pp. 129 – 31 . Barthes , R. ( 1977 ), Image/Music/Text ( New York

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
The imperial metropolis of Heart of Darkness
Laura Chrisman

chapter1 21/12/04 11:07 am Page 21 1 Tale of the city: the imperial metropolis of Heart of Darkness Many decades ago, in Discourse on Colonialism, Aimé Césaire drew attention to the ‘boomerang effect’ of imperialism. His account suggests that the boomerang operates at two speeds. The fast boomerang returns as soon as it is dispatched: the brutal dehumanisation to which the colonised are subjected is immediately visited upon the coloniser, leading Césaire to the conclusion that ‘colonization … dehumanizes even the most civilized man: that the colonizer, who

in Postcolonial contraventions
Robert Eaglestone

attention from ‘the ordinary and particular to that which lets the ordinary and particular have their peculiar shape and meaning’: the world.21 There is no ‘content’ in a simple sense: truth reveals a world into which ‘content’ is put. This world, unveiled in an artwork, will vary from work to work: the world of a Greek temple is not the world of a Van Gogh 154 Readings painting nor the world of Ulysses, Midnight’s Children or Heart of Darkness. Yet, this understanding of truth as unveiling a world cannot be reduced to truth as correspondence, but opens and shapes a

in The new aestheticism
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame
Elleke Boehmer

Ayemenem’s own ‘Kurtz’ and called the ‘Heart of Darkness’, is said to signify ‘history’ (that is, ‘important’ European history) to the children precisely because they are locked out of it (GST 52–3).33 It is the same building that, in the novel’s present, has been converted into a five-star hotel with, on display, the restored house of Kerala’s first Marxist Chief Minister (GST 67, 125–7). Here, too, abbreviated Kathakali performances are held for tourists – performances which do, however, help the traditional players to make ends meet. Inadvertent and/or forced complicity

in Stories of women
T.S. Eliot and Gothic hauntings in Waugh’s A Handful of Dust and Barnes’s Nightwood
Avril Horner and Sue Zlosnik

Modernist fascination with the formal studies of urban life . . . can be seen at its two extremes of ‘concept’ city, the radiant Utopia and the degenerate wasteland’.6 Furthermore, the location of these texts within Modernism is clearly signalled by their intertextual resonances. Waugh’s borrowing of his title from Eliot is echoed by further allusion in the text but the influence of Conrad’s Heart of Darkness is also clearly evident. In the words of Jeffrey Heath: Tony’s relationship with Todd resembles that of Marlow and Kurtz in Heart of Darkness. But unlike Tony, Marlow

in Special relationships
Open Access (free)
The bodyand counter-revolutionary warfare inapartheid South Africa
Nicky Rousseau

, vol. 2, pp. 257–67, vol. 6, pp. 198–203. Sean Callaghan, TRC Health Sector Hearing, available at www.justice. gov.za/trc/special/health/health01.htm (accessed 1 December 2012). John Liebenberg & Patricia Hayes, Bush of Ghosts: Life and War in Namibia, 1986–1990 (Fernwood: Umuzi/Random House, 2010), p. 247. Etienne van Heerden, ‘My Cuban’, in Mad Dog and Other Stories (Cape Town: New Africa Books, 1992), p. 74. Jacque Pauw, Into the Heart of Darkness: Confessions of Apartheid’s Assassins (Johannesburg: Jonathan Ball, 1997), p. 82; SWAPO, ‘SWATF/Koevoets not war

in Destruction and human remains
Sara Haslam

. 86. Ford Madox Ford in a letter to J. B. Pinker, 17 March 1913, in Richard Ludwig (ed.), Letters of Ford Madox Ford (Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1965), p. 56. In psychoanalytic terms, it is as though Lovell’s superego and id have been externalised and realised in appropriate surroundings. Crucial here are my earlier discussions of the fragmentation of modernism, and of the more common experience of the unresolved dissolutions of the self in modernist fiction (think of Heart of Darkness, say, or 180 Fragmenting modernism Prufrock, or Mansfield’s Bertha

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

”’ (p. 432), in an act which, tragically, has the greatest sexual potential of any yet witnessed.75 The final image of the book, caught up as it is with female symbolism, thus envelops it, becoming bigger than it, evoking Marlow’s interpretation of the ‘meaning of an episode’ in Conrad’s appropriately titled Heart of Darkness. Such meaning ‘was not inside like a kernel but outside, enveloping the tale which brought it out only as a glow brings out a haze’.76 The incident elicits a complete understanding, to which Ford’s tale has brought the reader, of the containing

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Where postcolonialism is neo-orientalist – the cases of Sarojini Naidu and Arundhati Roy
Elleke Boehmer

the west’s exotic interests and subversive desires? In this regard it is worth being reminded that The God of Small Things tells a heated tale of multiply forbidden desire. Exquisitely narrated from a feminine point of view, it is a tale which takes place against the luxuriant tropical backcloth of south India, a relocated, velvety black and only semi-ironic ‘heart of darkness’ (GST 1, 52, 125, 204, 267). In attempting to foreground the neocolonial and gender biases of some versions of postcolonial criticism, I am, I should belatedly stress, having to bracket the

in Stories of women