Author: Richard Parrish

The increasing commercialisation of sport raises important questions concerning regulation. The development of the European Union (EU) and the internationalization of sporting competition have added an international dimension to this debate. Yet sport is not only a business, it is a social and cultural activity. Can regulation at the EU level reconcile this tension? Adopting a distinctive legal and political analysis, this book argues that the EU is receptive to the claim of sport for special treatment before the law. It investigates the birth of EU sports law and policy by examining the impact of the Bosman ruling and other important European Court of Justice decisions, the relationship between sport and EU competition law, focusing particularly on the broadcasting of sport, the organization of sport and the international transfer system, and the relationship between sport and the EU Treaty, focusing in particular on the impact of the Amsterdam and Nice declarations on sport and the significance of the Helsinki report on sport. This text raises questions concerning the appropriate theoretical tools for analysing European integration.

Richard Parrish

of the EU, the use of sporting sanctions as a tool of Reconciling sport and law 187 foreign policy, the use of sport as a means of bringing the EU closer to EU citizens and mechanisms for improving the dialogue between the EU and the sports world. Following the meeting of the Directors, the Ministers for Sport met informally on 25 October in Vierumäki. At this meeting the Ministers agreed on the participation in the World Anti-Doping Agency for a two-year transitional period. Also at the meeting, the Commission submitted the Helsinki report on sport, a report

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Richard Parrish

general policy of the member states in the form of policy papers. The Helsinki report on Sport represents the Commission’s current position and the birth of a de facto if not de jure EU sports policy. From within the mediation and learning process has emerged compromise between the coalitions. The goal of mediation was to find grounds for compromise without undermining the deep and policy 208 Sports law and policy in the European Union core beliefs of both coalitions. As such, compromise has taken place within the secondary aspects of the coalitions belief systems

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Richard Parrish

Conference were then used by the Commission to prepare a report, at the European Council’s request, on an approach to safeguarding current sports structures and maintaining the social function of sport within the EU framework. The report 16 Sports law and policy in the European Union was submitted to the December 1999 Helsinki European Council. At the heart of the ‘new approach’ embodied in the Helsinki report is a framework for applying EU law to sport. The report claims that ‘this new approach involves preserving the traditional values of sport, while at the same time

in Sports law and policy in the European Union
Richard Parrish

issue of player contracts, the FIFPro report proposed the use of collective bargaining. FIFPro General secretary, Theo Van Seggelen, threatened to ‘go to court in every country’ if the FIFA/UEFA proposals were accepted, a threat UEFA described as ‘totally unacceptable’.59 The FIFA–UEFA split The December 1999 Helsinki report on sport presented the Commission’s position on the relationship between sport and the EU. In it, the Commission stressed that it would take the ‘specific characteristics’ of sport into account in the application of EU law if these characteristics

in Sports law and policy in the European Union