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Voyages in Search of Love

From the time of his early adolescence until his death, traveling was one of, if not the, driving force of James Baldwin’s life. He traveled to escape, he travelled to discover, and he traveled because traveling was a way of knowing himself, of realizing his vocation.

James Baldwin Review
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Anglo-American affinities and antagonisms 1854–1936

This book addresses the special relationship from the perspective of post-Second World War British governments. It argues that Britain's foreign policy challenges the dominant idea that its power has been waning and that it sees itself as the junior partner to the hegemonic US. The book also shows how at moments of international crisis successive British governments have attempted to re-play the same foreign policy role within the special relationship. It discusses the power of a profoundly antagonistic relationship between Mark Twain and Walter Scott. The book demonstrates Stowe's mis-reading and mis-representation of the Highland Clearances. It explains how Our Nig, the work of a Northern free black, also provides a working-class portrait of New England farm life, removed from the frontier that dominates accounts of American agrarian life. Telegraphy - which transformed transatlantic relations in the middle of the century- was used by spiritualists as a metaphor for the ways in which communications from the other world could be understood. The story of the Bolton Whitman Fellowship is discussed. Beside Sarah Orne Jewett's desk was a small copy of the well-known Raeburn portrait of Sir Walter Scott. Henry James and George Eliot shared a transatlantic literary network which embodied an easy flow of mutual interest and appreciation between their two milieux. In her autobiography, Gertrude Stein assigns to her lifelong companion the repeated comment that she has met three geniuses in her life: Stein, Picasso, and Alfred North Whitehead.

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Henry James reads George Eliot

8 Beyond the Americana: Henry James reads George Eliot Lindsey Traub With typically magisterial conviction, F.R. Leavis announced in the first chapter of The Great Tradition that ‘it can be shown, with a conclusiveness rarely possible in these matters, that James did actually go to school to George Eliot’.1 His argument is certainly convincing but his acute observations about the development of The Portrait of a Lady (1881) out of Daniel Deronda (1876), include the assertion that ‘Isabel Archer is Gwendolen Harleth and Osmond is Grandcourt’ or, on concession

in Special relationships
The Pony Express at the Diamond Jubilee

achieved a solid reputation as a deft visualiser of historical chronicle, Paramount understood the importance of linking authorship with those elites who had participated in the debates over movies’ social power. Consequently, they hired Henry James Forman, a Harvard-educated fiction writer and literary critic who had worked at several upscale magazines and was editor of Collier’s during the war. While

in Memory and popular film
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be the war’s moral low point, he warned. For, ‘to compel a man to fight, whether he will or not – in violation, perhaps, of his conscience, of his instinct, of his temperament – is an inexcusable outrage on his rights as a human being’.6 The emotional response of Edward Carpenter and Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson to the war was matched by that of Henry James, who had also experienced an assault upon rational sensibility as soon as hostilities had commenced, writing on 5 August 1914 that: The taper went out last night, and I am afraid I now kindle it again to a very

in A war of individuals
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suspicion was that the power of sexuality was coming to assert itself: certainly the growth of sexology and the rise of the ‘new woman’ were related. Dyer’s words ‘latent’, ‘crouched’ and ‘gathering’ conjure up Henry James’s ‘beast in the jungle’, sexual knowledge of self that will spring up and out, probably violently. Instinct has been sublimated to civilisation: as civilisation is shocked and changes, instinct begins to gain expression. Freud, in his professional and authorial role, was at least emblematic of modernism. He reflects it: ‘given the turbulence of

in Fragmenting modernism
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situate the American Revolution in the national imagination. His work acted as a prompt, helping her to ‘negotiate the complexities of this civil conflict in the creating of nations’. Lindsey Traub also invokes a monumental British precursor in her discussion of Henry James, examining his halfadmiring, half-anxious relationship with George Eliot. As the youthful reviewer of her novels, James tried to contain her in a patronising critical commonplace as ‘delightfully feminine’ in her writing. No less free of personal bias when he met her a few years later, he described

in Special relationships
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forced down to primitive levels fixed such levels for the general mass’, Caroline Playne later commented. It was these men, she continued: … possessing powers of original thought and intellectual initiative who would in former times have maintained their independence of judgement, exercise of reason – it was these men who were badly broken in the course of being shaped to the military pattern by rude and brutal methods.10 We have observed how the conflict was perceived by some as, in Henry James’s phrase, ‘the great interruption’ in human progress. In some quarters

in A war of individuals

art and literature were, as shown in the case of Lawrence Haward, not simply recorded with hindsight. In 1915, Henry James declared in an interview with the New York Times that the war had: used up words; they have weakened, they have deteriorated like motor car tires; they have, like millions of other things, been more overstrained and knocked about and voided of happy semblance during the last six months than in all the long ages before and we are now confronted with a depreciation of all our terms, or, otherwise speaking, with a loss of expression through

in A war of individuals
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out that his job as impressionist novelist of A Call is to render, not to ‘comment nor to explain’, he is being disingenuous.7 He does believe in intent, and shows how in his critical, some would say adulatory, work on Henry James. In confident and generous style, Ford describes ‘Mr. James’ as having never committed the sin of writing what he ‘wanted’ to write. If you ever chance to make, to an English novelist, any objections to parts of his work Personal perspectives 67 – he will, your English friend, reply that he ‘wanted’ to write it; as who should say he

in Fragmenting modernism