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Juvenile actors and humanitarian sentiment in the 1940s
Michael Lawrence

Rehabilitation Administration, stated in his November 1943 acceptance address: ‘We must be guided not alone by the compelling force of human sentiments but also by dictates of sound common sense and of mutual interest.’ 8 However, it is to those ‘human sentiments’ that Hollywood cinema’s ‘sorrowful spectacle’ of suffering children (sorrowful meaning both showing and causing grief) is most likely (and

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Editor:

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

Open Access (free)
New retro movies in 1990s Hollywood cinema
Philip Drake

, memorialised past is increasingly dependent upon, and recycled within, audiovisual representations such as those found in popular film. My aim is to consider how 1990s Hollywood cinema has activated a selective, revised sense of the past, and how memory approaches to film history are able to analyse this. In particular, I will stress how popular cultural memory is drawn upon as an aesthetic and commercial strategy of Hollywood

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood
Julian Stringer

. The Thames Silent Classics series established a useful baseline for examining the revival of classic Hollywood cinema at the London festival for two key reasons. First, such revivals immediately created a sense of rarefied distinction by activating the displaced meaning strategy around, on the one hand, aesthetics factors, and on the other, ‘special’ modes of public presentation. In short, these

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

identity formation. Examining specific ‘memory work’ within contemporary Hollywood cinema, Part II explores the specificity of film in constituting memory narratives that can function in coercive ways but that can also, alternatively, hold the potential for progressive political understanding. The first two chapters concentrate on the former tendency. Considering cinematic articulations of the Vietnam War in Hollywood film

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Michael Lawrence
and
Rachel Tavernor

order to address the ways in which humanitarianism was strategically linked to images of and ideas about childhood and internationalism, history and heritage, and altruistic intervention and ‘underdevelopment’. In ‘“United Nations Children” in Hollywood Cinema: Juvenile Actors and Humanitarian Sentiment in the 1940s’, Michael Lawrence addresses the significance of the child for representations of the United Nations in studio

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)
Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

Kuhn, ‘Cinema-going in Britain in the 1930s: Report of a Questionnaire Survey’, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television , 19: 4 (1999), 531–43. 3 Jackie Stacey, Star Gazing, Hollywood Cinema and Female Spectator-ship (London: New York, Routledge, 1994

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author:

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Katariina Kyrölä

necessitate more questioning, careful contextualisation and collective consideration of why, when and if to warn. Indeed there was a time when feminist, queer and critical race studies scholars were much more worried about the treacherousness of pleasure than about pain and hurt. For example, in the 1980s Mary Ann Doane (1982) interrogated the ways Hollywood cinema constructs the female body as an idealised and pleasurable spectacle. Through a recognition and pull of similarity, the female spectator has no choice but to over-​identify with the image, unless she fully

in The power of vulnerability
Johanna Gondouin
,
Suruchi Thapar-Björkert
, and
Ingrid Ryberg

reproduces the image of the sexually available, servile South East Asian woman-​as-​prostitute, a dominant stereotype of Asian women in Hollywood Cinema instated by iconic performances in Vietnam war films such as Michael Cimino’s The Deer Hunter (1978) and Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket (1987) (Prasso, 2005). In addition to the submissive and hypersexual Thai prostitute, these young women also come across as another stereotypical image of the third world woman:  the passive, silent victim, whose lack of agency allows the Western feminist subject to define herself as

in The power of vulnerability