Open Access (free)
Serbian and Croatian victim-centred propaganda and the war in Yugoslavia

Comparing and contrasting propaganda in Serbia and Croatia from 1986 to 1999, this book analyses each group's contemporary interpretations of history and current events. It offers a detailed discussion of Holocaust imagery and the history of victim-centred writing in nationalist theory, including the links between the comparative genocide debate, the so-called Holocaust industry, and Serbian and Croatian nationalism. There is a detailed analysis of Serbian and Croatian propaganda over the Internet, detailing how and why the Internet war was as important as the ground wars in Kosovo, Croatia and Bosnia-Hercegovina, and a theme-by-theme analysis of Serbian and Croatian propaganda, using contemporary media sources, novels, academic works and journals.

Open Access (free)
Jeffrey Flynn

of the humanitarian lens or its subjects as racialised (‘race’ does not even appear in the index, while ‘gender’ has ten entries). 2 Fehrenbach’s theme sets the stage for one of the most influential episodes in the twentieth century iconography of humanitarianism: Biafra. Heerten’s essay on Biafra and Holocaust imagery in Humanitarian Photography provides one of the case studies, but it is only a glimpse into the much broader take on Biafra provided by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Confronting relativism in Serbia and Croatia
David Bruce MacDonald

: confronting relativism in Serbia and Croatia root of conflict. In trying to analyse the successes and failures of Serbian and Croatian propaganda, we need to understand clearly whether or not any actual genocides took place in the Balkans, either in history, or during the more contemporary period. This includes the general question of whether the manipulation of Holocaust imagery is a useful means for nations to advance their political agendas. I have argued that general Fall imagery and imagery of the Holocaust have played an extremely important role in rallying

in Balkan holocausts?
Open Access (free)
David Bruce MacDonald

histories and legitimating state-building projects. As I will demonstrate from Chapters 3 to 8, Serbs and Croats entered into this timely and controversial debate. Both groups used claims of victimisation and persecution to legitimate their own state-building or state-expanding projects, with often violent consequences. Both the Judaeo-Christian covenantal culture and the instrumentalisation of Holocaust imagery have been of central importance in structuring 6 2441Introduction 16/10/02 8:02 am Page 7 Introduction Serbian and Croatian representations of the past and

in Balkan holocausts?
From universalisation to relativism
David Bruce MacDonald

issue with Novick’s conclusion that the use of Holocaust imagery was ‘arbitrary’. Rather, he contends that there have been consistent and deliberate attempts to use Jewish suffering to justify human rights atrocities in Israel. As with Novick, for Finkelstein 1967 is the crucial starting-point for the Holocaust becoming a crucial part of modern Jewish identity. While before 1967 the Final Solution was a horrible tragedy that was not often discussed, much less invoked as a defence of Israeli interests, it later became a crucial means of proving that Israelis were

in Balkan holocausts?
Maja Zehfuss

party. The ‘heirs of the peace movement’ had been overwhelmingly opposed to Bundeswehr participation in the Gulf War. 52 Yet Bosnia, and subsequently Kosovo, posed a completely different problem. Because of the atrocities committed, and the Holocaust imagery related to them, Bosnia came to be seen as a fundamental challenge to a pacifistic position. In the summer of

in Mapping European security after Kosovo