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Time-space, disciplines, margins

This book explores modernity, the disciplines, and their interplay by drawing in critical considerations of time, space, and their enmeshments. Based in anthropology and history, and drawing on social-political theory (as well as other, complementary, critical perspectives), it focuses on socio-spatial/disciplinary subjects and hierarchical-coeval tousled temporalities. The spatial/temporal templates reveal how modern enticements and antinomies, far from being analytical abstractions, intimate instead ontological attributes and experiential dimensions of the worlds in which we live, and the spaces and times that we inhabit and articulate. Then, the book considers the oppositions and enchantments, the contradictions and contentions, and the identities and ambivalences spawned under modernity. At the same time, rather than approach such antinomies, enticements, and ambiguities as analytical errors or historical lacks, which await their correction or overcoming, it attempts to critically yet cautiously unfold these elements as constitutive of modern worlds. The book draws on social theory, political philosophy, and other scholarship in the critical humanities in order to make its claims concerning the mutual binds between everyday oppositions, routine enchantments, temporal ruptures, and spatial hierarchies of a modern provenance. Then, it turns to issues of identity and modernity. Finally, the book explores the terms of modernism on the Indian subcontinent.

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An epilogue

This epilogue turns attention to salient subjects of a modernist provenance on the Indian subcontinent. Now, in South Asia, a certain haziness regarding modernism and modernity derives not only from the manner in which they can be elided with each other, but the fact that they are both frequently filtered through the optics of modernization. At stake is the acute, albeit altering

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
An introduction

and gender and class divisions as constitutive of colonial cultures, postcolonial locations, and Western orders. 19 Accompanying these developments, from the end of the 1970s critical departures were afoot in the history writing of the Indian subcontinent. Reassessments of nationalism in South Asia were often central to such endeavors. 20 Here an important role was played by the formation of the

in Subjects of modernity

-Caribbean descent, a few residents from the Indian sub-continent and groups of Chinese immigrants, but they had been insignificant in size or impact. Then everything began to change in the second half of the 1950s. The first significant wave of non-white immigration occurred in the 1950s. This was a time of full employment and there were significant shortages of labour in such fields as the health service and public transport. To meet the shortages, the government introduced a system of subsidised immigration, most from the West Indies. With expenses paid, the new immigrants were

in Understanding British and European political issues
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Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies

immigrants was necessarily even-handed. In the preface to The Empire Strikes Back (1982, hereafter Empire), for example, Gilroy acknowledged the relative lack of attention that the authors had paid to the South Asian ethnic group in Britain, explaining: ‘[we] have struck an inadequate balance between the two black communities. Only one of us has roots in the Indian subcontinent whereas four are of Afro-Caribbean origin. This accounts for the unevenness of our text’ (CCCS 1982: 7). Notwithstanding this particular asymmetry, though, the point that I want to make here is that

in Across the margins
The short history of Indian doctors in the Colonial Medical Service, British East Africa

trend for Indians to seek opportunities in the area was far from new. 10 Evidence from as early as AD 120 suggests the movement of people and trade between the Indian subcontinent and the African East Coast, and by the thirteenth century trading excursions by both Indians and Arabs to the African coast were commonplace, with dhows regularly moving between the shores of India, the Persian Gulf and East Africa using the seasonal

in Beyond the state
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Union in the Asia Europe Meeting (ASEM) process, which perhaps for the first time forced ‘Asia’ to decide what it was – and in the process, rejected both the Indian sub-continent and Australasia as comprised in Asia. So what the Asian values debate helps clarify is what Asia is not – it is not the advanced industrialized and democratized West. It is also framed by a world-view in many Asian governmental elites that is suspicious of the motives of the West in trying to condition developments in the region. And in many cases, the West is synonymous with the United

in Democratization through the looking-glass
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Antinomies and enticements

a land of endless tradition, recently rising from its slumber in the wake of globalization to truly embrace a Western modernity, share common ground with the pictures of the past few decades portraying the Indian subcontinent as combining the traditional with the modern. Both arguments rest upon exclusive, temporal blueprints and hierarchical, spatial oppositions of an essentially Western modernity

in Subjects of modernity
Imaginaries, power, connected worlds

the congested commerce of Asian ports. By the seventeenth century, it was evident that the caravan trade had begun to switch its axis. Possible decline in trans-​Asian trade was mitigated by the intensification of multi-​directional and intra-​regional trades in Central Asia and the Indian sub-​continent. Russian producers and merchants were incorporated into augmented north–​south flows into central and southern Asia across the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, much to the advantage of Central Asia and China. Some trades that also enhanced inter

in Debating civilisations
Crossing the (English) language barrier

, Stroud, ur cut ti cuttilbanes in America, which issa grecht big burdcage wi a tartan rug owre ut, tae shaw Roabirt Lowell. (from O’Rourke 1994: 146) Herbert hails from Dundee, a city which itself has a long and complicated history of Irish immigration and trade links with the Indian subcontinent; his views on language are worth quoting at length: My experience of being Scottish in England was the discovery of suppressed contrasts. Unlike Ireland, Scotland is not supposed to be ‘different’ or ‘foreign’. It is the country which is not quite a country, possessing a

in Across the margins