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The Tomašica mass grave and the trial of Ratko Mladić
Caroline Fournet

This article focuses on the judicial consideration of the scientific analysis of the Tomašica mass grave, in the Prijedor municipality of Republika Srpska in Bosnia-Herzegovina. Often referred to as the largest mass grave in Europe since the Second World War, this grave was fully discovered in September 2013 and the scientific evidence gathered was included in the prosecution of Ratko Mladić before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. Based on the exhaustive analysis of all the publicly available trial transcripts, this article presents how the Tomašica evidence proved symptomatic of the way in which forensic sciences and international criminal justice intertwine and of the impact of the former over the latter on the admissibility of evidence, the conduct of proceedings and the qualification of the crimes perpetrated.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
A twenty-first century trial?
Dominic McGoldrick

The trial of Slobodan Milosevic 9 The trial of Slobodan Milosevic: a twenty-first century trial? Dominic McGoldrick At 10.02 am on Tuesday, 3 July 2001, Slobodan Milosevic made an initial appearance before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).1 He wore a blue suit, a blue shirt, and a tie in the national colours of Serbia. He was the first former head of state in history to be prosecuted for war crimes by an international tribunal.2 This image of international criminal justice was flashed across the world’s media.3 The humbling

in Domestic and international trials, 1700–2000
Dispelling Misconceptions about Sexual Violence against Men and Boys in Conflict and Displacement
Heleen Touquet, Sarah Chynoweth, Sarah Martin, Chen Reis, Henri Myrttinen, Philipp Schulz, Lewis Turner, and David Duriesmith

2020 ). International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) ( 1997 ), Prosecutor v. Duško Tadić a/k/a “Dule” Case No. IT-94-1-T, Sentencing Judgment , 14 July , www.icty.org/x/cases/tadic/tjug/en/tad-sj970714e.pdf (accessed 20 July 2020 ). International Criminal Tribunal for the Former

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Legality and legitimacy
Dominic McGoldrick

66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 Workings of the International Criminal Tribunal of the Hague (The Hague: Kluwer, 1996); V. Morris and M. P. Scharf, An Insider’s Guide to the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (Irvington NY: Transnational Publishers, 1995); J. C. O’Brien, ‘The international tribunal for violations of international humanitarian law in the former Yugoslavia’, American Journal of International Law, 87 (1993), 643–59; [Symposium], ‘A critical study of the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia’, Criminal Law Forum 5 (1994

in Domestic and international trials, 1700–2000
Open Access (free)
Kjell M. Torbiörn

whole people and the systematic murdering of thousands. Milosevic’s actions flew in the face of the efforts of half a century of the United Nations, the Council of Europe, the European Union and NATO to reconcile nations, peoples, and promote human rights and tolerance.10 NATO’s action was in line with a more recent trend in history in the direction of greater international intervention on behalf of humanitarian values, as witnessed for instance in the creation of an International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in The Hague a few years earlier.11 This new

in Destination Europe
Open Access (free)
Why exhume? Why identify?
Élisabeth Anstett and Jean-Marc Dreyfus

utilization of the work of forensic pathologists by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia in 1995, or even the large-scale opening – only beginning in 2000 – of the mass graves of the Spanish Civil War. In Rwanda the victims of the genocide committed against the Tutsis were exhumed and reburied, sometimes repeatedly, by the tens of thousands between 1994 and today. This case of incomparable scale, which is sometimes accompanied by the exhibition of certain human remains or of entire bodies in memorials like those of Murambi or Ntarama, contrasts

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
John Mceldowney

tribunal at the end of the Second World War. More recently, there has been the establishment of the international criminal tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda. In July 1998 the UN conference adopted the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court and agreed to found a permanent International Criminal Court. The creation of a war crimes jurisdiction has some way to go before it is universally accepted by all countries in the world; but it is indicative of a developing role for judges. In developing a criminal law jurisdiction the judicial approach draws

in Democratization through the looking-glass
The forensic and political lives of secondary mass graves in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Admir Jugo and Sari Wastell

7 Disassembling the pieces, reassembling the social: the forensic and political lives of secondary mass graves in Bosnia and Herzegovina Admir Jugo and Sari Wastell Introduction In a powerful documentary film entitled Statement 710399, director, activist, and former employee of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) Refik Hodzić follows a trail of clues that he hopes will lead to the discovery of the fate of four young men (one a boy of only fifteen), who escaped the Srebrenica massacres only to be recaptured, interrogated, and

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
The politics of exhumation in post-genocide Rwanda
Rémi Korman

hypothesis seems improbably simple. It is more likely that the explanation is to be found in the political climate of this period, the beginning of 1996 having been marked by the ending of the mandate of the second United Nations Assistance Mission for Rwanda (UNAMIR II) in an acrimonious international context.28 Another hypothesis is that the Rwandan government was unhappy with the preferential treatment given by the United Nations to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). It is true that several investigators with PHR did split their time

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)
Confronting relativism in Serbia and Croatia
David Bruce MacDonald

textbooks (such as The Poisoned Toadstool), wall charts, and phrenological heads, detailing the subhuman and parasitic nature of the enemy. The Bosnian Moslem case was obviously more complex, since we do have proven cases of genocide here. On 2 August 2001, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia found the Bosnian Serb General Radislav Krstić guilty of genocide for his role in the execution of some 7,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys near Srebrenica in July 1995.30 More recently, Milošević himself was handed over to the Tribunal, to stand charges of

in Balkan holocausts?