Open Access (free)
An endangered legacy
Matteo Dian

Introduction This chapter will discuss the legacy of the Obama administration of 2009–17 for US–Japan relations. It will highlight elements of change and continuity that characterised the Obama years in the realms of security and economic policy, as well as the significance of historical memory and the processes of reconciliation between the two countries. It will also discuss policy shifts promoted by the administration of President Donald Trump at around the halfway mark of his 2017–21 presidential term in office. The Trump presidency, it is argued, has

in The United States in the Indo-Pacific
Mass graves in post-war Malaysia
Frances Tay

10 Remembering the Japanese occupation massacres: mass graves in post-war Malaysia Frances Tay The violence visited upon British Malaya during the Japanese occupation of December 1941 to August 1945 has prompted several historians to evoke comparisons with the atrocities that befell Nanjing.1 During this time, numerous civilians were subjected to mass killings, summary executions, rape, forced labour, arbitrary detention, and torture. In particular, the shukusei (cleansing) or daikensho (big inspection) operation of February to April 1942 – known locally as the

in Human remains and identification
Yasuko Nagano-Madsen and Håkan Lundström

Waka and ryūka are short poems originating in Japan and the Ryukyu Islands, respectively. Waka has a very long history and flourished during the Heian period, which began around the year AD 800. The waka studied here belong to Ogura Hyakunin Isshu , a collection of 100 waka compiled around the first half of the thirteenth century, and the karuta game based on it. Waka – nowadays often referred to as tanka – is widely used in contemporary Japan, from the New Year recital at the

in In the borderland between song and speech
Jeremy C.A. Smith

169 8 Japan in engagement and the discourses of civilisation If civilisational analysis is lacking with respect to Latin America, it has been far from inattentive when it comes to Japan. In previous chapters, Japan serves as an illustration of theoretical engagements with civilisational analysis, as well as illustrating different points of my own argument. The frequent choice of Japan is no coincidence: it has been a focal point of investigation for comparativists in the humanities, the social sciences and political economy with an interest in civilisations

in Debating civilisations
The Visual Politics and Narratives of Red Cross Museums in Europe and the United States, 1920s to 2010s
Sönke Kunkel

the Clara Barton Birthplace Museum ( Washington Post , 1921 ). Outside of the United States, too, the idea of a historical Red Cross museum found some followers. In Europe, an individual collector from Salzburg, Austria, curated a museum dedicated to humanitarian rescue missions, in 1929, and in Japan, a Red Cross museum opened its doors some years later. Unlike their American role model, both museums had only a marginal impact, however. The Japanese museum opened only temporarily for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

experienced this, and some have dared to describe this blindness. One was Jack London, the famous American writer sent to Korea to cover the Russo-Japanese war in 1904, who wrote, confused, of ‘black moving specks’, the ‘hubbub’, in short, ‘a war of ghosts’ (quoted in Audouin-Rouzeau, 2008 : 244). And when Le Figaro sent special correspondent Tanguy Berthemet to Sévaré (Mali) as France began its 2013 military operation (Operation Serval), he reported: ‘There is a war in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Brad Evans

appears humane. Technology then is not anti-human. It is the only thing that might save us. A point made by the scientist Richard Gatling, who, trying to justify his invention of the gun, noted: ‘If war was made more terrible, it would have a tendency to keep peace among the nations of the earth.’ The same redemptive narrative would be promulgated by those responsible for the atrocious nuclear assault on Japan, in 1945. The tragedy, however, is that the more we seek to regulate or civilise violence by giving ourselves over to the technological account of human

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell, and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

Technologies in Disaster Settings: The Case of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake ’, in O’Hagan , M. and Zhang , Q. (eds), Conflict and Communication: A Changing Asia in a Globalising World ( New York : Nova Science Publishers ), 169 – 94 . Cadwell , P

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Expanding Gender Norms to Marriage Drivers Facing Boys and Men in South Sudan
Michelle Lokot, Lisa DiPangrazio, Dorcas Acen, Veronica Gatpan, and Ronald Apunyo

.acordinternational.org/silo/files/conflict-and-gender-study--south-sudan.pdf (accessed 17 June 2021 ). Hutchinson , S. E. ( 1996 ), Nuer Dilemmas: Coping with Money, War, and the State ( Berkeley, CA : University of California Press ). JICA (Japan International Cooperation Agency) ( 2017 ), Country Gender Profile Republic of South Sudan Final Report , www.jica.go.jp/english/our_work/thematic_issues/gender/background/c8h0vm0000anjqj6-att/south_sudan_2017.pdf (accessed 22 August 2021 ). Jok , J. M. ( 1999 ), ‘ Militarism, Gender and Reproductive Suffering: The Case of Abortion in Western Dinka

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Interrogating civilisational analysis in a global age

Contemporary civilisational analysis has emerged in the post-Cold War period as a forming but already controversial field of scholarship. This book focuses on the scholarship produced in this field since the 1970s. It begins with anthropological axioms posited by Ibn Khaldun, Simon Bolivar and George Pachymeres. Three conceptual images of civilisations are prominent in the field. First, civilisations are conceived as socio-cultural units, entities or blocs in an 'integrationist' image. They emerge out of long-term uneven historical processes. Finally, in a 'relational' image civilisations are believed to gain definition and institute developmental patterns through inter-societal and inter-cultural encounters. The book traces the history of semantic developments of the notions of 'civilisation' and 'civilisations' coextensive with the expansion of Europe's empires and consubstantial with colonialism. Early modernities are more important in the long formation of capitalism. Outlining the conceptual framework of inter-civilisational engagement, the book analytically plots the ties instituted by human imaginaries across four dimensions of inter-civilisational engagement. It also interrogates the relationship between oceans, seas and civilisations. Oceanian civilisation exhibits patterns of deep engagement and connection. Though damaged, Pacific cultures have invoked their own counter-imaginary in closer proximity to past islander experiences. Collective memory provides resources for coping with critical issues. The book also explores Latin American and Japanese experiences that shed light on the engagement of civilisations, applying the model of inter-civilisational engagement to modern perspectives in culture and the arts, politics, theology and political economy.