Open Access (free)
Race and the Tragedy of American Democracy
Eddie S. Glaude Jr.

In this essay, Eddie S. Glaude, Jr. addresses the historical and contemporary failures of American democracy. Using the metaphor of “the magician’s serpent,” Glaude brings Walt Whitman’s views on democracy into the full light of America’s failure to resolve the problem of race. Glaude places Whitman’s Democratic Vistas (1871) in conversation with James Baldwin’s No Name in the Street (1972) in order to construct a different sort of reading practice that can both engage with Whitman’s views on democracy and reckon with what George Hutchinson calls Whitman’s “white imperialist self and ideology” as an indication of the limits of a certain radical democratic imagining.

James Baldwin Review
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5 5 1 1 Introduction Celebrating Our Current “Baldwin Moment” McBride Dwight A. 9 2019 5 5 1 1 1 1 8 8 10.7227/JBR.5.1 Feature Essay The Magician’s Serpent Race and the Tragedy of American Democracy Glaude Eddie S. Jr. 9 2019 5 5 1 1 9 9 22 22 10.7227/JBR.5.2 Essays What

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@gettysburg.edu 09 2016 2 2 1 1 6 6 27 27 10.7227/JBR.2.2 “To Crush the Serpent” James Baldwin, the Religious Right, and the Moral Minority Vogel Joseph vogelj@merrimack.edu 09 2016 2 2 1 1 28 28 48 48 10.7227/JBR.2.3 Possessing History and American Innocence James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the 1965 Cambridge Debate McClure Daniel Robert dmcclure@Exchange.FULLERTON.EDU 09 2016 2 2

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Award Time to Tell Knight Dennis Ray Jr. dknight8@eagles.nccu.edu 09 2017 3 3 1 1 131 131 151 151 10.7227/JBR.3.8 Dispatches The Process of Writing a Book about Baldwin’s Self-Exile in Saint-Paul de Vence Farber Jules B. julesfarber@wanadoo.fr 09 2017 3 3 1 1 152 152 159 159 10.7227/JBR.3.9 Queering I Am Not Your Negro : or Why We Need James Baldwin More Than Ever

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6 6 1 1 Introduction To Minimize the Bill That They Must Pay Joyce Justin A. 29 9 2020 6 6 1 1 1 1 12 12 1 10.7227/JBR.6.1 Feature Essays The Great Debate James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the Civil Rights Revolution University  Linfield 29 9 2020 6 6 1 1

Open Access (free)
Dennis Ray Knight Jr.

If he is known for anything other than his writings, James Baldwin is best known for his work as a civil rights activist. What is often overlooked is Baldwin’s work toward uniting two under-represented and oppressed groups: African Americans and homosexuals. With his first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, Baldwin began a career of speaking about and for homosexuals and their relationship with the institutions of African-American communities. Through its focus on a sensitive, church-going teenager, Go Tell It on the Mountain dramatizes the strain imposed upon homosexual members of African-American communities within the Pentecostal Church through its religious beliefs.

James Baldwin Review
Joy Molina Mirasol, Felix S. Mirasol, Estela C. Itaas Jr., and Benjamin Maputi

12 Enhancing local policymakers’ capacity in environmental governance in the Philippines Joy Molina Mirasol, Felix S. Mirasol, Jr., Estela C. Itaas and Benjamin Maputi Context The forest land in the province of Bukidnon, Philippines, is continuously declining in terms of its economic and environmental capacity. Forest destruction by timber poachers and conversion of forest land for agriculture are rising to an alarming level, leaving the remaining forest cover significantly below the desired 45 percent cover to sustain its services. Such decline and

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)
On James Baldwin and the Many Roles in Revolution
Nicholas Binford

Artists, scholars, and popular media often describe James Baldwin as revolutionary, either for his written work or for his role in the civil rights movement. But what does it mean to be revolutionary? This article contends that thoughtlessly calling James Baldwin revolutionary obscures and erases the non-revolutionary strategies and approaches he employed in his contributions to the civil rights movement and to race relations as a whole. Frequent use of revolutionary as a synonym for “great” or “important” creates an association suggesting that all good things must be revolutionary, and that anything not revolutionary is insufficient, effectively erasing an entire spectrum of social and political engagement from view. Baldwin’s increasing relevance to our contemporary moment suggests that his non-revolutionary tactics are just as important as the revolutionary approaches employed by civil rights leaders such as Malcolm X or Martin Luther King, Jr.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the Civil Rights Revolution
 Linfield University

Born in New York City only fifteen months apart, the Harlem-raised James Baldwin and the privileged William F. Buckley, Jr. could not have been more different, but they both rose to the height of American intellectual life during the civil rights movement. By the time they met in February 1965 to debate race and the American Dream at the Cambridge Union, Buckley—a founding father of the American conservative movement—was determined to sound the alarm about a man he considered an “eloquent menace.” For his part, Baldwin viewed Buckley as a deluded reactionary whose popularity revealed the sickness of the American soul. The stage was set for an epic confrontation that pitted Baldwin’s call for a moral revolution in race relations against Buckley’s unabashed elitism and implicit commitment to white supremacy. In this article I introduce readers to the story at the heart of my new book about Baldwin and Buckley, The Fire Is Upon Us.

James Baldwin Review
James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the 1965 Cambridge Debate
Daniel Robert McClure

The 1965 debate at Cambridge University between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, Jr., posed the question: “Has the American Dream been achieved at the Expense of the American Negro?” Within the contours of the debate, Baldwin and Buckley wrestled with the ghosts of settler colonialism and slavery in a nation founded on freedom and equality. Framing the debate within the longue durée, this essay examines the deep cultural currents related to the American racial paradox at the height of the Civil Rights movement. Underscoring the changing language of white resistance against black civil rights, the essay argues that the Baldwin and Buckley debate anticipated the ways the U.S. would address racial inequality in the aftermath of the civil rights era and the dawn of neoliberalism in the 1970s.

James Baldwin Review