María José Sarrabayrouse Oliveira

The military coup of March 1976 in Argentina ruptured the prevailing institutional order, with the greater part of its repressive strategy built on clandestine practices and tactics (death, torture and disappearance) that sowed fear across large swathes of Argentine society. Simultaneously, the terrorist state established a parallel, de facto legal order through which it endeavoured to legitimise its actions. Among other social forces, the judicial branch played a pivotal role in this project of legitimisation. While conscious of the fact that many of those inside the justice system were also targets of oppression, I would like to argue that the dictatorship‘s approach was not to establish a new judicial authority but, rather, to build upon the existing institutional structure, remodelling it to suit its own interests and objectives. Based on an analysis of the criminal and administrative proceedings that together were known as the Case of the judicial morgue, this article aims to examine the ways in which the bodies of the detained-disappeared that entered the morgue during the dictatorship were handled, as well as the rationales and practices of the doctors and other employees who played a part in this process. Finally, it aims to reflect upon the traces left by judicial and administrative bureaucratic structures in relation to the crimes committed by the dictatorship, and on the legal strategies adopted by lawyers and the families of the victims.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
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Indian morgues: what makes a medico-legal autopsy complete? Provost Fabien October 2017 3 3 2 2 22 22 37 37 10.7227/HRV.3.2.3 The role of the Judicial Morgue in Argentinas state terrorism: bureaucratic circuits of repression (1976–83) Sarrabayrouse Oliveira María José October 2017 3 3 2 2 38 38 55 55 10.7227/HRV.3.2.4 Uruguayan mortuaries and the No Names: the

Towards atypology of the treatment of corpses of ‘disappeared detainees’ in Argentinafrom 1975 to 1983
Mario Ranalletti

extreme violence that were brought to the Córdoba judicial morgue by military personnel was investigated, following a complaint made by Juan Caro, an employee of the morgue. Caro told Córdoba Federal Court No. 1 (in the ‘Menéndez’ case) that between 1976 and 1977 he remembered receiving a large DHR.indb 148 5/15/2014 12:51:18 PM The treatment of corpses in Argentina  149 quantity of corpses from military personnel, and in some cases he counted up to eighty gunshot wounds on a single body.11 In addition, we used information relating to the fate of the bodies that was

in Destruction and human remains