In Twelfth Night 2.5, the billet-doux which gulls Malvolio proclaims, I may command where I adore, but silence like a Lucresse knife: With bloodlesse stroke my heart doth gore, M.O.A.I. doth sway my life. (100

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

This book will come as a revelation to Shakespeare scholars everywhere. It reveals the identity of the playwright and Shakespeare’s colleague behind the mask of Jaques in As You Like It. It pinpoints the true first night of Twelfth Night and reveals why the play’s performance at the Inns of Court was a momentous occasion for shakespeare. It also the identities Quinapalus, the Vapians, Pigrogromitus and Feste, as well as the ‘Dark Lady’ of the Sonnets and the inspiration for Jessica in The Merchant of Venice. And it solves Shakespeare’s greatest riddle: the meaning of M.O.A.I. in Twelfth Night. In sum, this book reveals William Shakespeare as a far more personal writer than we have ever imagined.

’s Apolonius and Silla is accepted as the proximate source of Twelfth Night , Shakespeare’s inspiration for the forged letter plot that gulled and humiliated Malvolio – including the mysterious M.O.A.I. – were drawn whole cloth from events in Harvey’s life found in Nashe’s Saffron-Walden. Feste’s final lament When the

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind

one of Shakespeare’s most long-debated and vexatious riddles. Below, I’ll suggest solutions to a number of Twelfth Night ’s other nagging cruces: Who is Quinapalus? Pigrogromitus? Who inspired Malvolio and Feste? And what’s the meaning of those exasperating letters M.O.A.I. ? Notes

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind