Open Access (free)
Biography of a Radical Newspaper
Robert Poole

The newly digitised Manchester Observer (1818–22) was England’s leading radical newspaper at the time of the Peterloo meeting of August 1819, in which it played a central role. For a time it enjoyed the highest circulation of any provincial newspaper, holding a position comparable to that of the Chartist Northern Star twenty years later and pioneering dual publication in Manchester and London. Its columns provide insights into Manchester’s notoriously secretive local government and policing and into the labour and radical movements of its turbulent times. Rich materials in the Home Office papers in the National Archives reveal much about the relationship between radicals in London and in the provinces, and show how local magistrates conspired with government to hound the radical press in the north as prosecutions in London ran into trouble. This article also sheds new light on the founding of the Manchester Guardian, which endured as the Observer’s successor more by avoiding its disasters than by following its example. Despite the imprisonment of four of its main editors and proprietors the Manchester Observer battled on for five years before sinking in calmer water for lack of news.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
Open Access (free)
Writing about Personal Experiences of Humanitarianism
Róisín Read
,
Tony Redmond
, and
Gareth Owen

yourself and your book? Tony Redmond (TR): I am Tony Redmond. I’m a medical doctor, training at Manchester Medical School and going on to be a consultant in Emergency Medicine and then Professor of Emergency Medicine and finally Professor of International Emergency Medicine. I co-founded HCRI 1 and founded an international medical NGO, UK-Med. 2 My book focuses on my involvement in the professional development of medical humanitarian assistance, both within the UK and internationally. Gareth Owen (GO): My name is Gareth Owen. I am the Humanitarian Director at

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Synchronicity in Historical Research and Archiving Humanitarian Missions
Bertrand Taithe
,
Mickaël le Paih
, and
Fabrice Weissman

research resource, in Birmingham, in NGO history; 3 this has since ceased to be available online – reflecting acutely the fleeting nature of digital records ( Hilton et al. , 2013 ). More recently, the University of Manchester has opened the Humanitarian Archive 4 which collects the private papers and archives of individual humanitarians and smaller humanitarian organisations. Humanitarian archives have always been key to the sustainability of any claims of accountability and transparency ( Roddy et al

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Róisín Read
Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh
Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sophie Roborgh

Monitoring of attacks on healthcare has made great strides in the past decade, even if improvement in information has not necessarily resulted in changes on the ground. However, important questions on the knowledge production process continue to be under-explored, including those pertaining to the objectives of monitoring efforts. What does our data actually tell us? Are we missing the (data) point? This paper explores several monitoring mechanisms, and analyses the limitations of the data-gathering exercise, affecting the ability of healthcare workers to share their experiences. By drawing on the experiences of those involved in the medical-humanitarian response in non-government controlled areas in Syria, these dynamics are further brought to the fore, advocating for a more discerning approach in the use of data for such disparate goals as analysis on patterns of attacks (and their implications), advocacy, and accountability.

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanity and Solidarity
Tanja R. Müller
and
Róisín Read
Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editors’ Introduction
Tanja R. Müller
and
Gemma Sou
Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh
and
Bertrand Taithe
Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

This book provides an account of the University of Manchester's struggle to meet the government's demands for the rapid expansion of higher education in the 1950s and the 1960s. It looks at the University's ambitious building programme: the controversial attempts to reform its constitution and improve its communications amid demands for greater democracy in the workplace, the struggle to retain its old pre-eminence in a competitive world where new ‘green field’ universities were rivalling older civic institutions. The book tells the story, not just from the point of view of administrators and academics, but also from those of students and support staff (such as secretaries, technicians and engineers). It not only uses official records, but also student newspapers, political pamphlets and reminiscences collected through interviews.