This book provides an account of the University of Manchester's struggle to meet the government's demands for the rapid expansion of higher education in the 1950s and the 1960s. It looks at the University's ambitious building programme: the controversial attempts to reform its constitution and improve its communications amid demands for greater democracy in the workplace, the struggle to retain its old pre-eminence in a competitive world where new ‘green field’ universities were rivalling older civic institutions. The book tells the story, not just from the point of view of administrators and academics, but also from those of students and support staff (such as secretaries, technicians and engineers). It not only uses official records, but also student newspapers, political pamphlets and reminiscences collected through interviews.

Open Access (free)
Biography of a Radical Newspaper
Robert Poole

The newly digitised Manchester Observer (1818–22) was England’s leading radical newspaper at the time of the Peterloo meeting of August 1819, in which it played a central role. For a time it enjoyed the highest circulation of any provincial newspaper, holding a position comparable to that of the Chartist Northern Star twenty years later and pioneering dual publication in Manchester and London. Its columns provide insights into Manchester’s notoriously secretive local government and policing and into the labour and radical movements of its turbulent times. Rich materials in the Home Office papers in the National Archives reveal much about the relationship between radicals in London and in the provinces, and show how local magistrates conspired with government to hound the radical press in the north as prosecutions in London ran into trouble. This article also sheds new light on the founding of the Manchester Guardian, which endured as the Observer’s successor more by avoiding its disasters than by following its example. Despite the imprisonment of four of its main editors and proprietors the Manchester Observer battled on for five years before sinking in calmer water for lack of news.

Bulletin of the John Rylands Library
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Achievement and self-doubt
Brian Pullan and Michele Abendstern

chap 2 23/9/03 1:15 pm Page 29 2 The academics: achievement and self-doubt ‘It is a great university, even if people never tire of telling you so.’ Academics leaving Manchester for supposedly more benign places were inclined to pay back-handed compliments to the University. In the 1970s the institution was proud of its achievements and given to reciting them at length. Needing to assert its distinction and to struggle against its austere appearance, it possessed neither the ancient universities’ sense of natural superiority nor the Londoners’ confidence that

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
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.1.2 The Manchester Observer Biography of a Radical Newspaper Poole Robert 03 2019 95 95 1 1 30 30 122 122 3 10.7227/BJRL.95.1.3

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1 1 3 3 Editorial Innovation in Humanitarian Action Editors’ Introduction Müller Tanja R. tanja.mueller@manchester.ac.uk Sou Gemma gemma.sou@manchester.ac.uk 01 09 2019 13 02 2020 1 1 3 3 1 1 3 3 19 10.7227/JHA.019 Research Article More than Laboratories Four Decisive Challenges Confronting Humanitarian

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2 2 1 1 Introduction Lorem Ipsum Paris Joyce Justin A justin-joyce@northwestern.edu Field Douglas douglas.field@manchester.ac.uk McBride Dwight A dwight-mcbride@northwestern.edu 09 2016 2 2 1 1 1 1 5 5 10.7227/JBR.2.1 Essays I've Got a Testimony James Baldwin and the Broken Silences of Black Queer Men Melton McKinley E mmelton

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1 1 2 2 Editorial Negotiating Humanitarian Security – between Norms and Practices Editor’s Introduction Neuman Michaël Michael.Neuman@paris.msf.org Espada Fernando F.Espada@savethechildren.org.uk Read Róisín roisin.read@manchester.ac.uk 01 05 2019

Open Access (free)
Brian Pullan and Michele Abendstern

have wished for a little less unglamorous realism and for even louder rage against the dying of the light: When statesmen gravely say – ‘We must be realistic –’ The chances are they’re weak and therefore pacifistic: chap 13 23/9/03 294 1:19 pm Page 294 A history of the University of Manchester But when they talk of Principles – look out – perhaps Their generals are already poring over maps. In retrospect Sir Mark was widely praised for urging the reform of the life sciences and bringing them closer to the Faculty of Medicine. His own vision, and that of the

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
Brian Pullan and Michele Abendstern

, although they still picketed and petitioned by way of protest. Demonstrators still clashed with the police, and a few Manchester students were arrested for public order offences, but in London, not in Manchester. In 1989–90 the Union Executive temporarily lost faith in the effectiveness of demonstrations. Symptomatic of a new mood was the failure of the Socialist Workers’ Students Society, in February 1990, to win support for their proposals to occupy the University offices in protest against the introduction of student loans the following autumn. To authorise such

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
Open Access (free)
Brian Pullan and Michele Abendstern

chap 7 23/9/03 1:17 pm Page 142 7 Contraction, 1981–84 ‘As you are aware’, wrote the Vice-Chancellor to the Chairman of the UGC on 8 February 1982, ‘the University of Manchester, as the largest unitary university in the country, has a scale of problems in absolute terms which is not faced by any other similar university.’ The arid prose of official communications did little justice to the upheavals of the previous months. It had seemed that the University would be able to escape bankruptcy only by shedding one-seventh of its academic and supporting staff

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90