Chronic disease and clinical bureaucracy in post-war Britain
Author: Martin D. Moore

Through a study of diabetes care in post-war Britain, this book is the first historical monograph to explore the emergence of managed medicine within the National Health Service. Much of the extant literature has cast the development of systems for structuring and reviewing clinical care as either a political imposition in pursuit of cost control or a professional reaction to state pressure. By contrast, Managing Diabetes, Managing Medicine argues that managerial medicine was a co-constructed venture between profession and state. Despite possessing diverse motives – and though clearly influenced by post-war Britain’s rapid political, technological, economic, and cultural changes – general practitioners (GPs), hospital specialists, national professional and patient bodies, a range of British government agencies, and influential international organisations were all integral to the creation of managerial systems in Britain. By focusing on changes within the management of a single disease at the forefront of broader developments, this book ties together innovations across varied sites at different scales of change, from the very local programmes of single towns to the debates of specialists and professional leaders in international fora. Drawing on a broad range of archival materials, published journals, and medical textbooks, as well as newspapers and oral histories, Managing Diabetes, Managing Medicine not only develops fresh insights into the history of managed healthcare, but also contributes to histories of the NHS, medical professionalism, and post-war government more broadly.

Future crafting in the genomic era
Series: Inscriptions

What does it mean to personalise cancer medicine? Personalised cancer medicine explores this question by foregrounding the experiences of patients, carers and practitioners in the UK. Drawing on an ethnographic study of cancer research and care, we trace patients’, carers’ and practitioners’ efforts to access and interpret novel genomic tests, information and treatments as they craft personal and collective futures. Exploring a series of case studies of diagnostic tests, research and experimental therapies, the book charts the different kinds of care and work involved in efforts to personalise cancer medicine and the ways in which benefits and opportunities are unevenly realised and distributed. Investigating these experiences against a backdrop of policy and professional accounts of the ‘big’ future of personalised healthcare, the authors show how hopes invested and care realised via personalised cancer medicine are multifaceted, contingent and, at times, frustrated in the everyday complexities of living and working with cancer. Tracing the difficult and painstaking work involved in making sense of novel data, results and predictions, we show the different futures crafted across policy, practice and personal accounts. This is the only book to investigate in depth how personalised cancer medicine is reshaping the futures of cancer patients, carers and professionals in uneven and partial ways. Applying a feminist lens that focuses on work and care, inclusions and exclusions, we explore the new kinds of expertise, relationships and collectives involved making personalised cancer medicine work in practice and the inconsistent ways their work is recognised and valued in the process.

Open Access (free)
Sex, family planning and British female doctors in transnational perspective, 1920–70

Women’s medicine explores the key role played by British female doctors in the production and circulation of contraceptive knowledge and the handling of sexual disorders between the 1920s and 1970s at the transnational level, taking France as a point of comparison. This study follows the path of a set of women doctors as they made their way through the predominantly male-dominated medical landscape in establishing birth control and family planning as legitimate fields of medicine. This journey encompasses their practical engagement with birth control and later family planning clinics in Britain, their participation in the development of the international movement of birth control and family planning and their influence on French doctors. Drawing on a wide range of archived and published medical materials, this study sheds light on the strategies British female doctors used, and the alliances they made, to put forward their medical agenda and position themselves as experts and leaders in birth control and family planning research and practice.

Open Access (free)
Sokhieng Au and Anne Cornet

nleke nge kunsimbidi, mono k’insimbidi ko. Kimpaka-mpaka udia mwaka, gana ubioka, kiad ye kia! bioko iziola mu nitu, kakala nkonso, kakala ngolo, Ngege unyambula, kaleka bwo, kasikama ntangu nlungu.) 1 This chapter reviews the history of medicine in what were the Belgian colony of Congo and

in Medical histories of Belgium
Open Access (free)
Renaud Bardez and Pieter Dhondt

tradition, and without doubt the person should also enjoy good health. 1 Jean-Jacques Bouckaert, the dean of the medical faculty of Ghent University, gave this speech at the Royal Academy of Medicine in 1958, during a debate on the preparation of a reform of the medical curriculum. His words

in Medical histories of Belgium
Open Access (free)
Joris Vandendriessche and Tine Van Osselaer

, ‘infuses life and generates energy for divine Charity to rule and spread’. The book is a telling record of the interwoven histories of Belgian medicine and Catholicism. Entries from the 1930s adopt a militant and expansionist rhetoric at a time of Catholic Action, the movement to re-Christianise society in the face of secularisation: ‘Charity is victorious and St Raphael dreams of

in Medical histories of Belgium
Jolien Gijbels and Kaat Wils

In 1875, the entrance of women to the medical profession was discussed in the Belgian parliament. Along with discussions within medical societies, this public debate is an important source to study gendered views about women’s involvement in medicine. About three-quarters of a century before women’s suffrage was fully granted in Belgium, it was evident

in Medical histories of Belgium
Tinne Claes and Katrin Pilz

Figure 9.1 from 1914 promised women a way to ‘develop and firm their chest’. 1 The seller provided expert evidence in order to convince customers – namely, two images contrasting the internal anatomy of the breast before and after treatment, accompanied by references from ‘very well-known doctors of medicine’. The advertisement seems to reflect a well-known historiographical

in Medical histories of Belgium
Dirk Luyten and David Guilardian

history have not received as much attention in Belgium as compared to the Netherlands, Great Britain or France. 2 And most of the time they have been touched upon indirectly. In the 1990s sociopolitical literature on the history of social security, for instance, the financial aspects of medicine in Belgium have been analysed at macro level, but always in the context of a larger

in Medical histories of Belgium
Roslyn Kerr

cases, it is very difficult for an athlete or coach to determine the exact state of the actor-network inside the body. This problem is generally solved by enrolling sports scientists and medical professionals into the sporting arena. Indeed, experts in sports science and medicine are now assumed to make up a significant part of a competitive athlete’s actor-network. These experts have a range of technological tools at their disposal that are able to reveal the inner workings of the body and suggest solutions

in Sport and technology