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Drawing on nearly a decade of wide-ranging, multidisciplinary research undertaken with young people and adults living and working in urban communities in Zambia, this jointly-authored book extends existing understandings of the use of sport to contribute to global development agendas has burgeoned over the last two decades. The book’s locally-centred and contextualized analysis represents an important departure from both the internationalist and evaluation-orientated research that has predominated in global sport for development. Offering wide-ranging historical, political, economic and social contextualization, it examines how a key period in the expansion of the sport for development sector unfolded in Zambia; considers the significance of varying degrees of integration and partnership practices between sport for development and development agencies at different levels; and outlines approaches to the provision of sport for development activities in various communities. Detailed examination of the lives, experiences and responses of young people involved in these activities, drawn from their own accounts, is a key feature of the book. Concluding reflections identify possibilities for enhancing understanding and improving research and evidence through methodologies which ‘localise global sport for development’. The book’s unique approach and content will be highly relevant to academic researchers and students studying sport and development across many different contexts.

The forest land in the province of Bukidnon, Philippines, is continuously declining in terms of its economic and environmental capacity. Acosta called on the government and challenged the academy and other agencies to be more aggressive about measuring the efficacy of government programmes and policies on a range of environmental concerns. Collaborative efforts among the academy, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and local government units (LGUs) have to be pursued to achieve good environmental management in local governance, economic growth and to prevent further damage to environment and natural resources. Bukidnon State University (BSU) Institute of Environmental Governance (IEG) was established to carry out programmes aimed at providing the needed capacity for local executives and local policymakers to better perform their mandate as provided under the Local Government Code.

in Knowledge, democracy and action

This chapter lays out briefly how the work of the Citizenship Development Research Consortium (CDRC) is impacting university curricula and pedagogy across a global selection of higher education institutions (HEIs). The CDRC formed a teaching and learning group which has been experimenting with various ways in which citizenship can be taught within a formal university curricula and a traditional classroom setting. Not all members of the CRDC are university researchers. The Indian non-governmental organization (NGO) in Participatory Research in Asia (PRIA) has been one of the core institutional members of the group. PRIA has been an influential pioneer in participatory action research (PAR) and community-based research (CBR) in the global South. PRIA has designed a two-year MA in participatory development which includes a year of intensive coursework and a year of PAR fieldwork.

in Knowledge, democracy and action

The Danish Society for the Conservation of Nature (DN) of Frederikssund is a local committee of a national non-governmental organization (NGO) working towards protecting nature and the environment. DN Frederikssund addresses local issues regarding the protection of nature and the environment to achieve local sustainable development. It initiates local campaigns, participates in political hearings and comments on the municipality's environmental strategies and plans. In the mid-1990s, DN Frederikssund became aware of science shops through correspondence from the science shops at Roskilde University Centre (RUC). DN Frederikssund saw this as an opportunity to engage in research about the pollution levels in village ponds in Frederikssund municipality. DN Frederikssund has defined more project requests for the science shops at RUC and the University of Copenhagen (KU). The NGO was able to use the results to pressure the municipality of Frederikssund on the issue of the lakes' health.

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)
Why exhume? Why identify?

legitimacy constructed? The agents present within this domain are often many and varied, including families, non-governmental organizations, civil, religious and judicial institutions, survivors’ associations, judges, and the media themselves. The combined contributions here show that the agents may be local or national, often reinforced by an intervention (technical, legal, political, or financial) emanating from elsewhere and frequently from abroad, by way of criminal courts, governmental or non-governmental organizations, or occupation or peacekeeping forces. With

in Human remains and identification
Open Access (free)

INTRODUCTION research on the status of women; and collecting sexdisaggregated data. The report to the Commission in 19915 focused on information systems and identified the acquisition, analysis and dissemination of information on the advancement of women as essential factors for the success of national machineries. It suggested that location, staff improvement, access to modern communication technologies and networking, especially with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and with the UN system, were crucial indicators for success. During the thirty-fifth session of the

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Impact of structural tensions and thresholds

Tanzania, while the latter was called for by Argentina in the face of mounting criticism from NGOs. 82 In August 1977, a draft decision sponsored by Argentina, and supported by the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia, 83 was adopted by ECOSOC, which requested the Secretary-General ‘to invite interested Member States to provide any relevant information concerning compliance by non-governmental organizations with the principles

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Open Access (free)
Looking forward

varied interest groups, without creating a trust between non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and women’s CONCLUSIONS 267 groups on the one hand, and national machinery on the other, the raison d’être collapses. If national machineries are unable to generate a dialogue with civil society because they are perceived as unaccountable, arrogant and removed from concerns of women’s groups organizing in the field, the purpose for which national machineries have been created would not be achieved. Finally, there is a strong efficiency argument attached to accountability

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
State-based institutions to advocate for gender equality

these. Its formal mandate explicitly excludes project implementation functions, except for demonstration and experimentation purposes. However, its limited impact on ADVOCATE FOR GENDER EQUALITY 73 cross-ministerial decision making has made it focus instead on public awareness building and on implementing pilot projects which are donor funded and often executed by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), prompting the observation that SERNAM behaves more like an NGO than a part of the public administration (Pollack, 1994a:20). In its operational work it focuses

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?
Grassroots exceptionalism in humanitarian memoir

–2; D . Lewis , Non-Governmental Organizations, Management and Development ( Oxford and New York : Routledge , 3rd edn, 2014 ), pp. 34 – 5 . 9 It is now possible to get a bachelor’s or master’s degree in Europe and North America in such areas as Global Humanitarian Engineering, Logistics Management-Humanitarian and

in Global humanitarianism and media culture