Open Access (free)
An Interview with James Campbell
Douglas Field
and
Justin A. Joyce

James Baldwin Review editors Douglas Field and Justin A. Joyce interview author and Baldwin biographer James Campbell on the occasion of the reissue of his book Talking at the Gates (Polygon and University of California Press, 2021).

James Baldwin Review
A history
Hans Bertens

, was more reluctant to adopt the new term. This was partly due to a false start. The first one to apply ‘post-modern’ to the novel was the influential socialist critic Irving Howe who in 1959 published an article titled ‘Mass Society and Post-Modern Fiction’. Howe here sees postmodernism, represented for him by the fiction of such writers as Bernard Malamud, Norman Mailer and Saul Bellow, as a phenomenon of the American 1950s. For Howe post-war American society is characterized by an erosion of traditional

in Post-everything
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Comedy, the anti-pastoral and literary politics
David Brauner

) and by explicit allusions to other ‘wild American Jews I admired’ (323–24), such as Saul Bellow (64, 91) and Norman Mailer (64, 80, 103). Moreover, Who Gives a Monkey’s? seems to bear more than a passing resemblance to Bernard Malamud’s novel God’s Grace (1982), in which the sole survivor of a nuclear apocalypse creates a new society with a group of chimpanzees, cohabiting and procreating with them, before they turn against him, finally hanging him as they ‘laughed, screamed, barked, hooted’ ( Malamud 1983 : 196). Ableman himself claims that Who Gives a Monkey

in Howard Jacobson
Open Access (free)
Philip Roth, antisemitism and the Holocaust
David Brauner

more fully than my father believed we [i.e. English Jews] had, or ever would’ (35), it is tempting to see an implied analogy with those American Jewish authors, such as Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, Norman Mailer, Joseph Heller and, of course, Philip Roth, whose works were much more frequently to be found on the bookshelves of English Jews of Glickman Senior’s generation than those of their arguably less adventurous, certainly lesser-known, British Jewish contemporaries. Although Glickman Junior distances himself from the deference to American Jews expressed in this

in Howard Jacobson