The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale presents one of the most famous depictions of a patron of the visual arts in early modern English drama. In the penultimate scene of the play, we are told that the Sicilian courtier, Paulina, is in possession of a ‘statue’ of the dead Sicilian queen, Hermione (5.2.93). ‘Hearing of her mother’s statue’, Perdita, Hermione’s long

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Spectators, aesthetics and encompletion
Author: Chloe Porter

This book discusses early modern English drama as a part of visual culture. It concerns the ideas about 'making and unmaking' that Shakespeare and his contemporaries may have known and formulated, and how these ideas relate to the author's own critical assumptions about early modern aesthetic experience. The study of drama as a part of visual culture offers the perfect context for an exploration of pre-modern aesthetic discourse. The book expounds the author's approach to plays as participants in a lively post-Reformation visual culture in the process of 're-formation'. It then focuses on the social meanings of patronage of the visual arts in a discussion of Paulina as patron of Hermione's image in The Winter's Tale. The discussion of The Winter's Tale pivots around the play's troubling investment in patriarchal notions of 'perfection'. The book also explores image-breaking in Robert Greene's Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. This play presents an instance of onstage iconoclasm in the supernatural destruction of a demonic brazen head, a quasi-magical figure that had been depicted in English literature since at least the twelfth century. In focusing on the portrayal of invisibility in The Two Merry Milkmaids, the book explores early modern preoccupation with processes of visual construction in a play in which there is very little artisanal activity.

Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

are invited to ‘awake … faith’ in the possibility that the Sicilian courtier Paulina can ‘make the statue move’, and are also advised not to ‘kiss’ or touch the statue, which is ‘newly fixed’ (5.3.46–95). In Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay , meanwhile, Miles, a young scholar, is pointlessly armed with ‘pistols’ and acts ineffectually at the moment at which the brazen head

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

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Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

the instance in The Winter’s Tale in which Leontes and Paulina discuss the possibility of the king’s remarriage, and Paulina advises that this event may only take place if Leontes meets with ‘another / As like Hermione as is her picture’ (5.1.74–5). The loss of property occasioned by the death of the wife in this example is translated into the irreplaceable loss of an incomparable aesthetic

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Divine destruction in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Chloe Porter

yielding unto Vandermast’ (ix.143). Bacon’s authority is here centred on his ability to apply prohibition to the actions of mortal and supernatural agents in relation to spectacle, and recalls Paulina’s prohibition on touching the image of Hermione in her ‘chapel’ in The Winter’s Tale (5.3.86). In that play, a lack of physical contact with an image participated in the construction of Hermione’s statue as

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Translatina world-making in The Salt Mines and Wildness
Laura Horak

’t know.’ Karen’s friend notes that they were, ‘Murdered with guns. In the area. Because of discrimination’, and ‘That makes us really scared’. The film documents a press conference about the murder of trans teen Paulina Ibarra, with signs that demand ‘Stop Killing US!’ One major difference between the two films, though, is that while the feminine Salt People in 1990 did not share a coherent sense of identity, the women of the Silver Platter seem to share a sense of belonging to not just one but  109 Visibility and vulnerability 109 several nameable, politicised

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

information on the effects of the tests on her foetus and on the effect of her health conditions on the pregnancy itself, so decided to fly to England to gain access to abortion services. Once back home, she complained about not having received adequate post-abortion care. Moving to the Inter-American system of protection of human rights, the case of Paulina del Carmen Ramírez Jacinto v. México was filed with the IACommHR and concluded with a friendly settlement agreement.368 Paulina Jacinto, 14 years old at the time, fell pregnant in consequence of rape. Under Mexican law

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Colonialism, Jewishness and politics in Bacon’s New Atlantis
Claire Jowitt

impossible. Like Salomon’s House, the New Atlantis does not, indeed cannot, easily divulge its secrets. Notes For helpful critical readings of earlier drafts of this essay I would like to thank the following: Eliane Glaser, Andrew Hadfield, Paulina Kewes, Sarah Prescott, and Diane Watt. 1 Brian Vickers (ed.), Francis Bacon: A Critical Edition of the Major Works (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1996), pp. 457–89 (p. 382). All subsequent references to Bacon’s The Advancement of Learning, Essays, and New Atlantis are to this edition. Page references to New Atlantis will

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
Chloe Porter

function as onstage spectators. In The Winter’s Tale , Paulina is patron of the supposed statue of Hermione; in Lyly’s Campaspe , Alexander the Great commissions a portrait of Campaspe, while in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay , Friar Bacon oversees a demonic image-making process. Since The Two Merry Milkmaids concerns spectatorship within the visual field rather than of a specific artwork, there

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama