Labour and cultural change
Author: Steven Fielding

This book is the first in the new series The Labour Governments 1964–70 and concentrates on Britain's domestic policy during Harold Wilson's tenure as Prime Minister. It deals, in particular, with how the Labour government and Labour party as a whole tried to come to terms with the 1960's cultural revolution. The book is grounded in original research, takes account of responses from Labour's grass roots and from Wilson's ministerial colleagues, and constructs a total history of the party at this critical moment in history. It situates Labour in its wider cultural context and focuses on how the party approached issues such as the apparent transformation of the class structure, the changing place of women in society, rising immigration, the widening generation gap, and increasing calls for direct participation in politics. Together with the other volumes in the series, on international policy and economic policy, the book provides an insight into the development of Britain under Harold Wilson's government.

An Interview with Celso Amorim, Former Brazilian Foreign Minister
Juliano Fiori

seminar on democracy in the coming weeks, motivated by Lula’s situation. The seminar was the suggestion of Dominique de Villepin, who was French foreign minister and prime minister during the government of [President Jacques] Chirac. Villepin is a republican in the French sense, a democrat, but he isn’t a man of the Left. He recently said to me, ‘The world misses Brazil,’ because Brazil was bringing a soft power that isn’t only for its own benefit. As soon as we put our house in order… sure, it is clear that we need to stop cutting down the Amazon

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
How Can Humanitarian Analysis, Early Warning and Response Be Improved?
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example again: business fortunes and political careers were launched on the back of the massive international spending in Somalia during the UNITAF-UNOSOM period 1992–94, and the delivery contracts for in-kind food aid of the 2000s assisted the commercial and political ambitions of some members of the elite, including a prime minister and numerous regional or local officials ( Ahmed, 2017 ; Jaspars et al. , 2019 ). The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Hakim Khaldi

in charge of distributing the aid to the needy. 8 When, in 2014, an MSF team was kidnapped by ISIL, no contact was made with Damascus. However, between January 2015 and April 2018, various other official requests – always via Syria’s permanent mission in Geneva – were addressed to the offices of the President, the Prime Minister and the First Lady, as well as to the foreign affairs and health ministries and SARC

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migrants, Prime Minister Matteo Renzi was heavily defeated. A new government was formed, led by the populist Five Star Movement and including the far-right Lega, whose leader Matteo Salvini was made interior minister, and the most prominent figure of the government. Salvini moved quickly to close Italy’s ports to NGO search and rescue vessels. On 10 June, the MV Aquarius was returning to port with 630 migrants, refugees and asylum seekers when it was

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
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everybody – predictability, peaceful resolution of conflict, a last line of protection – and that even if a state disagrees with one or other actual norms, having a system of norms is valuable enough to keep them in the fold. But these norms do not have to be liberal. In the time of slavery, for example, international norms about the slave trade and aspects of empire were agreed by major states. 3 UK prime minister Theresa May recently called global elites citizens not of the world but of ‘nowhere’ ( Merrick, 2017

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Marie-Luce Desgrandchamps, Lasse Heerten, Arua Oko Omaka, Kevin O'Sullivan, and Bertrand Taithe

attacks on civilian targets and their suffering. For example, it was usually appealing for Biafrans to hear that they were fighting with Britain and not Nigeria. They saw the British Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, as the real enemy of Biafrans while General Gowon [military head of the Nigerian state] was portrayed as his deputy. The USSR also gave open support to the Nigerian government. What helped Biafra so much was the kind of propaganda machine it was able to set up. The

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Peter D.G. Thomas

Chap 10 19/8/02 11:49 am Page 219 10 George III, Lord North and the defeat of ‘faction’ (1770) The political contest at the beginning of 1770 marked the culmination of the events of the first decade of George III’s reign. The King’s opponents pitted the power of the House of Commons against that of the Crown, but circumstances tipped the balance in favour of the monarchy. The success of Lord North enabled George III to defy ‘faction’ and make good his royal claim to have a Prime Minister of his own choice. When Parliament met on 9 January neither the eve

in George III
The Stamp Act Crisis
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Lord Lyttelton, but it helps to explain the widespread contemporary opinion that the new ministry would be short-lived. Inexperience and a perceived lack of ability; Pitt’s indifference; Bute’s reputed influence; the indignant hostility of the displaced Grenville and Bedford factions: none of this boded well for the new administration. Prime Minister Rockingham, devoid of administrative experience, had seemingly been promoted above the level of his ability. But his charm and integrity made him a good team leader, and he was to remain head of his party until his death

in George III
Political re-alignments
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in March.3 North’s debating and administrative skills were already so apparent that he had recently sometimes attended cabinet, even though he only held the post of Joint Paymaster General. He was to surpass expectations by creating the permanent administration George III had been seeking since 1760. North became the main prop of government: for nearly fifteen years he was Chancellor of the Exchequer and Commons Leader, replacing Conway at the beginning of 1768; and Prime Minister for over twelve years from January 1770. In 1767, however, that development lay in

in George III