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Cora Kaplan

The distinguished critic Professor Cheryl A. Wall (1948–2020) was the Board of Governors Zora Neale Hurston Professor of English at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Her path-breaking scholarship in two highly influential monographs, Women of the Harlem Renaissance (1995) and Worrying the Line: Black Women Writers, Lineage, and Literary Tradition (2005), helped to ensure that twentieth-century Black women writers were recognized and valued for their power, genius, and complexity. Her most recent book, On Freedom and the Will to Adorn: The Art of the African American Essay (2018), places the essay form at the center of African American literary achievement. Throughout her long career she supported and enabled Black students, and championed racial diversity and gender equality at every level of the university. An Associate Editor of James Baldwin Review, she was the most generous and astute of readers, as well as a wise editor. In this memorial section, fifteen colleagues, former students, and interlocutors share their remembrances and honor her legacy.

James Baldwin Review
The Politics of ‘Proximity’ and Performing Humanitarianism in Eastern DRC
Myfanwy James

’ . Internal archives . MSF-OCP ( 2012 ), ‘Dossier1210 Sitrep41 Rutshuru’ . Internal archives . Neuman , M. and Weissman , F. ( 2016 ), Saving Lives and Staying Alive: Humanitarian Security in the Age of Risk ( London : Hurst & Co. ). Peters , R. ( 2016 ), ‘Local in Practice: Professional Distinctions in Angolan Development Work’ , American Anthropologist , 118 : 3 , 495 – 507 . Peters , R. ( 2020 ), Implementing Inequality: The Invisible Labor of International Development ( New Brunswick, NJ : Rutgers University Press ). Pottier , J. ( 2006

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
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Design and material culture in Soviet Russia, 1960s–80s
Author: Yulia Karpova

The major part of this book project was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 700913.

This book is about two distinct but related professional cultures in late Soviet Russia that were concerned with material objects: industrial design and decorative art. The Russian avant-garde of the 1920s is broadly recognised to have been Russia’s first truly original contribution to world culture. In contrast, Soviet design of the post-war period is often dismissed as hackwork and plagiarism that resulted in a shabby world of commodities. This book identifies the second historical attempt at creating a powerful alternative to capitalist commodities in the Cold War era. It offers a new perspective on the history of Soviet material culture by focusing on the notion of the ‘comradely object’ as an agent of progressive social relations that state-sponsored Soviet design inherited from the avant-garde. It introduces a shared history of domestic objects, handmade as well as machine-made, mass-produced as well as unique, utilitarian as well as challenging the conventional notion of utility. Situated at the intersection of intellectual history, social history and material culture studies, this book elucidates the complexities and contradictions of Soviet design that echoed international tendencies of the late twentieth century. The book is addressed to design historians, art historians, scholars of material culture, historians of Russia and the USSR, as well as museum and gallery curators, artists and designers, and the broader public interested in modern aesthetics, art and design, and/or the legacy of socialist regimes.

Colonial powers and Ethiopian frontiers 1880–1884 is the fourth volume of Acta Aethiopica, a series that presents original Ethiopian documents of nineteenth-century Ethiopian history with English translations and scholarly notes. The documents have been collected from dozens of archives in Africa and Europe to recover and present the Ethiopian voice in the history of Ethiopia in the nineteenth century. The present book, the first Acta Aethiopica volume to appear from Lund University Press, deals with how Ethiopian rulers related to colonial powers in their attempts to open Ethiopia for trade and technological development while preserving the integrity and independence of their country. In addition to the correspondence and treatises with the rulers and representatives of Italy, Egypt and Great Britain, the volume also presents letters dealing with ecclesiastical issues, including the Ethiopian community in Jerusalem.

Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

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The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Open Access (free)
Chris Toumey

: Ashgate. Toumey, C. (1996). Conjuring Science: Scientific Symbols and Cultural Meanings in American Life. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)
The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva
Elisabeth Bronfen and Barbara Straumann

, rev. edn, 2010 ). 9 See Burton W. Peretti, The Leading Man: Hollywood and the Presidential Image (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press 2012 ). 10 ‘Queen Elizabeth’s armada speech to the troops at Tilbury, August 9, 1588’, in Leah S. Marcus

in The British monarchy on screen
From Vietnam to the war in the Persian Gulf
John Storey

. 34 Michael Klein, ‘Historical Memory, Film, and the Vietnam Era’, in Linda Dittmar and Gene Michaud (eds), From Hanoi To Hollywood: The Vietnam War in American Film (New Brunswick and London: Rutgers University Press, 1990), p. 18. 35 Quoted in Klein, ‘Historical

in Memory and popular film
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Barbara Prainsack and Sabina Leonelli

Disciplines. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. Rappert, B. (2015). Sensing absence. In B. Rappert and B. Balmer (eds), Absence in Science, Security and Policy (pp. 3–33). London: Palgrave. Rose, H., and Rose, S. (1976). The radicalisation of science. In H. Rose and S. Rose (eds), The Radicalisation of Science: Ideology of/in the Natural Sciences (pp. 1–31). London: Macmillan Education. Rose, H., and Rose, S. (1979). Radical science and its enemies. In R. Miliband and J. Saville (eds), Socialist Register (pp. 317–335). Atlantic Highlands, NJ: Humanities Press

in Science and the politics of openness