Tadesse Simie Metekia

Atrocities that befell Ethiopia during the Dergue regime (1974–91) targeted both the living and the dead. The dead were in fact at the centre of the Dergue’s violence. Not only did the regime violate the corpses of its victims, but it used them as a means to perpetrate violence against the living, the complexity of which requires a critical investigation. This article aims at establishing, from the study of Ethiopian law and practice, the factual and legal issues pertinent to the Dergue’s violence involving the dead. It also examines the efforts made to establish the truth about this particular form of violence as well as the manner in which those responsible for it were prosecuted and eventually punished.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Domestic change through European integration
Otmar Höll, Johannes Pollack and Sonja Puntscher-Riekmann

two coalition parties, followed suit. After all provincial governors, as well as the four institutions of the system of social partnership, had come out in favour of EC membership in March 1989, the Social Democratic Party – Sozialdemokratische Partei Österreichs (SPÖ) – finally decided to vote for the application which was subsequently lodged in July 1989.7 This development was only logical for the ÖVP under Foreign Minister Alois Mock, who was an early and enthusiastic advocate of European integration, whereas the SPÖ underwent a certain change in its stand on

in Fifteen into one?
Open Access (free)
Geoffrey K. Roberts and Patricia Hogwood

)/Staatkundig Gereformeerde Partij SKL Finnish Christian Union/Suomen Kristillinen Liitto SNP Scottish National Party SP Centre Party (Norway)/Senterpartiet SP Socialist Party (Belgium: Flemish-speaking)/Socialistische Partij SP Socialist Party (Ireland) SP/PS Social Democratic Party (Switzerland)/Sozialdemokratische Partei-Parti Socialiste SPD Social Democratic Party (Germany)/Sozialdemokratische Partei Deutschlands SPÖ Austrian Social Democratic Party

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
Geoffrey K. Roberts and Patricia Hogwood

(SPÖ) and Austrian People’s Party (ÖVP), which had been under considerable strain. When the two parties failed to reach a coalition agreement, Austria found itself short of viable alternatives. The record gains of the radical right Freedom Party of Austria (FPÖ) had changed the balance of power within the party system. The other two numerically viable coalitions – SPÖ/FPÖ or ÖVP/FPÖ – had been ruled out in advance by the two

in The politics today companion to West European Politics
Catherine Rhodes

–30, 2012, http://osp.od.nih.gov/sites/default/files/ resources/03302012_NSABB_Recommendations_1.pdf (last accessed 8 October 2016). NSABB [National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity] (2016), Recommendations for the Evaluation and Oversight of Proposed Gain of Function Research, http:// o sp.o d . n i h . gov/sit e s /defau lt /f i le s /re s ou rc e s / N SA B B _ Fi n a l _ R ep or t _ Recommendations_ Evaluation_Oversight_ Proposed_Gain_of_ Function_ Research.pdf (last accessed 8 October 2016). NSABB [National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity] (n

in The freedom of scientific research
Open Access (free)
Kjell M. Torbiörn

had come about as coalition negotiations between the ÖVP and its earlier partner, the Austrian SocialDemocratic Party (Sozialdemokratische Partei Österreichs – SPÖ) had broken down. The other fourteen governments of the EU reacted by downgrading relations with Austria, provoking a bitter debate about the meaning of national sovereignty and about whether the quest for morality as the basis for an emerging new international order should take precedence over the democratic expression of a people’s will. With the FPÖ obtaining virtually as many votes as the ÖVP in the

in Destination Europe
Open Access (free)
Geoffrey K. Roberts and Patricia Hogwood

end of the war. After periods in the diplomatic service and as a civil servant, he was appointed Austrian Foreign Minister in 1959, a position he retained until 1966. In 1967 he became leader of the Social Democratic Party (the SPÖ). Though head of a minority government in 1970, Kreisky’s personal popularity contributed to his party’s successes in elections in 1971, 1975 and 1979, where in each case it secured an absolute

in The politics today companion to West European Politics