Editors: Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

There has been increasing interest and debate in recent years on the instituted nature of economic processes in general and the related ideas of the market and the competitive process in particular. This debate lies at the interface between two largely independent disciplines, economics and sociology, and reflects an attempt to bring the two fields of discourse more closely together. This book explores this interface in a number of ways, looking at the competitive process and market relations from a number of different perspectives. It considers the social role of economic institutions in society and examines the various meanings embedded in the word 'markets', as well as developing arguments on the nature of competition as an instituted economic process. The close of the twentieth century saw a virtual canonisation of markets as the best, indeed the only really effective, way to govern an economic system. The market organisation being canonised was simple and pure, along the lines of the standard textbook model in economics. The book discusses the concepts of polysemy , idealism, cognition, materiality and cultural economy. Michael Best provides an account of regional economic adaptation to changed market circumstances. This is the story of the dynamics of capitalism focused on the resurgence of the Route 128 region around Boston following its decline in the mid-1980s in the face of competition from Silicon Valley. The book also addresses the question of how this resurgence was achieved.

Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

, necessary ignorance. Unfortunately for post-humanitarianism, however, it has little to offer in return – other, that is, than timely value-added information such that the precariat can positively enjoy the experience of its own abjection. Notes 1 While important, current concerns over data privacy and the power of Silicon Valley are secondary to these paradigmatic changes. Things like privacy can be addressed. Changes in the way the world is understood, experienced and interrogated represent a greater political and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
The resurgence of Route 128 in Massachusetts
Michael H. Best

, suggested that industry in Massachusetts was in terminal decline. Combined with the setbacks in these major markets was the emerging prominence of Silicon Valley, which was fostering and commercialising innovations much faster than was Route 128, and often in the same technologies. Clearly, few were willing to bet on the resurgence of Route 128. Nevertheless, the predictions of industrial gloom turned out to be wrong, or at least premature. A return to growth beginning in 1992 long surpassed the ‘Massachusetts’ Miracle’.2 Why the rise, the crash, and the rise again

in Market relations and the competitive process
A distant reading of the contemporary moment
Caroline Bassett

technology as control technology Contemporary examples that fit squarely into this category are Jonathan Taplin's Move Fast and Break Things (2017), and Jamie Bartlett's The People versus Tech (2018). Both make the case for the erosion of democracy by the tech corporations and their products – and both point to the consolidation of power in the new digital economy's heartland. Bartlett's book asks if we have ‘unwittingly handed too much away to shadowy powers behind a wall of code, all manipulated by a handful of Silicon Valley utopians, ad men, and

in Anti-computing
G. Honor Fagan

’ of Silicon Valley. O’Hearn argues, for example, that US computer and pharmaceutical companies have set the tone for the ‘Celtic Tiger’, which has transformed the economic, social and cultural make-up of the country.12 Whether the economic growth of the ‘Celtic Tiger’ is perceived to have set the scene for the cultural transformation of Ireland, or conversely whether cultural development is thought to have set the scene for economic growth, we have here an argument that Ireland can be historically and economically placed as ‘American’. Recent Irish political and

in The end of Irish history?
Open Access (free)
Stan Metcalfe and Alan Warde

causation to account for the continuing weak presence of the UK in the software product segments of the global market. In the final chapter, Michael Best provides an account of regional economic adaptation to changed market circumstances. This is the story of the dynamics of capitalism focused on the resurgence of the Route 128 region around Boston following its decline in the mid-1980s in the face of competition from Silicon Valley. The chapter addresses the question of how this resurgence was achieved. The core of the explanation is that a new model of business had to

in Market relations and the competitive process
Open Access (free)
How anti-computing time-travels
Caroline Bassett

poring over the temple architectures of the giant corporations in Silicon Valley in search of the ‘DNA’ of their owners and the character of what is (only very partially) made within their grounds. To read a homogeneous ‘global’ narrative of computerization off from this central dashboard is to misrecognize the significance of the location of material (as well as immaterial) production, the specific experience and use conditions of billions of instantiated users, and the complexity of the flow of technologies, ideas, and workers to and from the dominant hubs. Indeed

in Anti-computing
Treachery, the archive, and the database
Caroline Bassett

Silicon Valley and its virtual suburbs have demonstrated that this history of alignment is more complex and certainly more partial than is often suggested. Such works have explored the diverse connections between the technology innovators and the counter-cultural movements of the 1960s and early 1970s (Levy, 1984 , Cringley, 1996 , Turner, 2006 ), and there is also the evidence of this to be found in Whole Earth Review (and perhaps in publications such as Ted Nelson's Computer Liberation ). Fred Turner's work on Stuart Brand (the Whole Earth creator), for

in Anti-computing
Open Access (free)
Postfeminist genealogies in millennial culture
Stéphanie Genz

, 1987), p. 282. 8 Judith Stacey, ‘Sexism by a Subtler Name? Postindustrial Conditions and Postfeminist Consciousness in the Silicon Valley’, Socialist Review , 96 (1987), 7–28. 9 Julie Ewington, ‘Past the Post: Postmodernism and Postfeminism’, in C. Moore (ed.), Dissonance: Feminism and the Arts 1970–90 (St Leonards: Allen & Unwin, 1994), pp. 109–21. 10 Charlotte Brunsdon, Screen Tastes: Soap Opera to Satellite

in Post-everything
Open Access (free)
Christopher T. Marsden

the British government but vociferously opposed and held in contempt by the Germans, and indeed much of the social democratic polity. 58 Instead, their platform protection against Silicon Valley venture capital-backed attempts to overturn European-regulated accommodation and taxi services, amongst others, is daily backed by those constituencies on which business travellers depend

in Network neutrality