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Drawing on nearly a decade of wide-ranging, multidisciplinary research undertaken with young people and adults living and working in urban communities in Zambia, this jointly-authored book extends existing understandings of the use of sport to contribute to global development agendas has burgeoned over the last two decades. The book’s locally-centred and contextualized analysis represents an important departure from both the internationalist and evaluation-orientated research that has predominated in global sport for development. Offering wide-ranging historical, political, economic and social contextualization, it examines how a key period in the expansion of the sport for development sector unfolded in Zambia; considers the significance of varying degrees of integration and partnership practices between sport for development and development agencies at different levels; and outlines approaches to the provision of sport for development activities in various communities. Detailed examination of the lives, experiences and responses of young people involved in these activities, drawn from their own accounts, is a key feature of the book. Concluding reflections identify possibilities for enhancing understanding and improving research and evidence through methodologies which ‘localise global sport for development’. The book’s unique approach and content will be highly relevant to academic researchers and students studying sport and development across many different contexts.

Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

1 Sport for development in policy, practice and research Sport has a lengthy history of servicing ‘social development’ objectives. The contemporary SfD movement is thus following a well-known tradition that includes the use of sport to support, for example, ‘muscular Christianity’ in the nineteenth century and diverse development aims in the twentieth (Beacom, 2007 ; Kidd, 2011 ; Darnell, 2012 ). The use of sport for these purposes has

in Localizing global sport for development
International, national and community integration
Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

on the International Year of Sport and Physical Education, for example, suggests that: Local development through sport particularly benefits from an integrated partnership approach to sport for development involving the full spectrum of actors in field-based community development including all levels and various sectors of Government, sports organizations and federations

in Localizing global sport for development
Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

2005. Alongside this, a multitude of indigenous organizations both within and outside the sport sector engaged in SfD, with researchers from one South African university reporting that over 200 organizations, including schools, youth groups and community organizations, were using sport for development purposes in Lusaka alone (Jeanes and Kay, 2010 ). Two points are particularly relevant here with regard to this influx and expansion of SfD

in Localizing global sport for development
Open Access (free)
Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

Introduction This book emerges from the authors’ shared experiences of conducting research into ‘sport for development’ in Zambia since 2006. The period during which we have been carrying out this work has been one of burgeoning growth in the use of sport to foster social change, during which sport for development (hereafter, SfD) has emerged as a ‘new social movement’ (Kidd, 2008 ) operating on a truly global scale. Like many

in Localizing global sport for development
Open Access (free)
Their lives and social contexts
Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

engage. In relation to SfD in Lusaka, the most central of these is educational provision. As we have seen previously, education is both a development goal in itself and a mechanism through which wider development activities may be delivered and/or supported. At local level, there can therefore be multiple intersections between different aspects of ‘education’ and SfD, across its sport-for-development and sport-development forms. In Lusaka, for

in Localizing global sport for development
Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

programmes, despite warnings such as Coakley's ( 2011 ) against making uncritical assumptions that sport can contribute to development. The terminology of ‘ sport for development’ could itself be considered indicative of sport as a singular social practice rather than a diverse one. As Spaaij ( 2009 : 1266) emphasizes, however, there are ‘important questions about which sports and sports processes produce what outcomes, for which participants and in what circumstances

in Localizing global sport for development
Open Access (free)
Localizing global sport for development
Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

Conclusions: localizing global sport for development In this chapter we draw together the main themes which have emerged from our research in Zambia, and reflect critically on how they may contribute to the overall aspiration for this book: to ‘localize’ global SfD. We are equally concerned with the knowledge and understanding that our empirical work may offer and with the research processes that have underpinned it. We first consider

in Localizing global sport for development
Open Access (free)
Young people’s experiences of SfD
Iain Lindsey, Tess Kay, Ruth Jeanes, and Davies Banda

especially young women, ‘is rarely considered as part of the evidence base of sport for development and is often dismissed’. As Guest proposes ( 2009 : 1348), it would therefore ‘be useful to know more about the diversity of actual experience of individuals and communities as related to development through sport programmes’ before researchers critically interrogate their impact. This chapter is intended to offer such a contribution to the SfD

in Localizing global sport for development