Gender and narrative in L’Hiver de beauté, Les Ports du silence and La Rage au bois dormant by Christiane Baroche

   Textual mirrors and uncertain reflections: gender and narrative in L’Hiver de beauté, Les Ports du silence and La Rage au bois dormant by Christiane Baroche Un roman est un miroir qui se promène sur une grande route. (Stendhal) (A novel is a mirror travelling along a highway.) L’écriture est la possibilité même du changement, l’espace d’où peut s’élancer une pensée subversive, le mouvement avant-coureur d’une transformation des structures sociales et culturelles. (Cixous) (Writing is precisely the very possibility of change, the space that can serve as

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
From the Global to the Local

of Palestinians in the Middle East. Equally, it veils the adverse effects of UNRWA’s own regional and local-level operational processes on a wide range of people, including UNRWA’s Palestinian staff members. I demonstrate this, firstly, by developing a close textual analysis of three regional-level UNRWA circulars disseminated to UNRWA staff in early 2018. Several of my interviewees in Lebanon shared the full text of these circulars with me, showing me the circulars they had received by email from UNRWA on their mobile phones and/or laptops

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

Reorienting the narrative of digital media studies to incorporate the medieval, Participatory reading in late-medieval England traces affinities between digital and medieval media to explore how participation defined reading practices and shaped relations between writers and readers in England’s literary culture from the late-fourteenth to early sixteenth centuries. Traditionally, print operates as the comparative touchstone of both medieval and digital media, but Participatory reading argues that the latter share more in common with each other than either does with print. Working on the borders of digital humanities, medieval cultural studies, and the history of the book, Participatory reading draws on well-known and little-studied works ranging from Chaucer to banqueting poems and wall-texts to demonstrate how medieval writers and readers engaged with practices familiar in digital media today, from crowd-sourced editing to nonlinear apprehension to mobility, temporality, and forensic materiality illuminate. Writers turned to these practices in order to both elicit and control readers’ engagement with their works in ways that would benefit the writers’ reputations along with the transmission and interpretation of their texts, while readers pursued their own agendas—which could conflict with or set aside writers’ attempts to frame readers’ work. The interactions that gather around participatory reading practices reflect concerns about authority, literacy, and media formats, before and after the introduction of print. Participatory reading is of interest to students and scholars of medieval literature, book, and reading history, in addition to those interested in the long history of media studies.

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John Lydgate’s ‘Soteltes for the coronation banquet of Henry VI’

stones of the wall. 106 Participatory reading in late-medieval England ‘Abbey Walk’ thus represents reading that emerges from the representation of an overlooked category of medieval textual media that I call ‘extracodexical’. An extracodexical text is a written work that circulates outside the boundaries of the familiar codex, whether manuscript or print book. Heraldry, dishes, walls, tapestries, and embroidered or woven textiles and other objects are common surfaces for medieval extracodexical texts, which can also take the form of various charms and talismans

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England

chapter9 21/12/04 11:23 am Page 145 9 Cultural studies in the new South Africa How we conceptualise future directions of cultural studies depends on how we have conceptualised the origins and genealogy of that discipline. In the UK, two stories of origins have emerged, the textual and the sociological. The future theorisation and analysis of South African cultural studies may follow either story. The textual version is probably dominant within British academia. It locates three texts, Richard Hoggart’s The Uses of Literacy, E.P. Thompson’s The Making of the

in Postcolonial contraventions
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The Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes

2 Nonlinear reading: the Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes Published in 1549, The book of common prayer for the first time presented the reformed services for worship as reconceived in the wake of English separation from the Church of Rome. In considering medieval reading practices, a passage from its preface deserves particular attention. The preface targets for condemnation the consequences of what it considers flawed Catholic practices of textual organization, stating that the Bible ‘hath be so altered, broken and neglected

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
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what I think is at stake in our appreciation and enjoyment of these inescapably popular narratives: romance’s status as a socially and aesthetically degenerate form of fiction and its capacity to generate textual pleasure. Not everyone will agree with it, but if it MUP_McDonald_01_Intro 2 11/18/03, 16:56 A polemical introduction 3 stimulates debate about popular romance it will have more than served its purpose. Dangerous recreations Medieval romance shares with other incendiary fictions a reputation for subverting social and moral order: indecent, unorthodox

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
An anthology

This is a companion to Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance: An anthology (2016), the largest ever collection of its kind. The monograph-length Introduction traces the course of pastoral from antiquity to the present day. The historical account is woven into a thematic map of the richly varied pastoral mode, and it is linked to the social context, not only by local allegory and allusion but by its deeper origins and affinities. English Renaissance pastoral is set within the context of this total perspective.

Besides the formal eclogue, the study covers many genres: lyric, epode, georgic, country-house poem, ballad, romantic epic, drama and prose romance. Major practitioners like Theocritus, Virgil, Sidney, Spenser, Drayton and Milton are discussed individually.

The Introduction also charts the many means by which pastoral texts circulated during the Renaissance, with implications for the history and reception of all Early Modern poetry. The poems in the Anthology have been edited from the original manuscripts and early printed texts, and the Textual Notes comprehensively document the sources and variant readings. There are also notes on the poets and analytical indices of themes, genres, and various categories of proper names. Seldom, if ever, has a cross-section of English Renaissance poetry been textually annotated in such detail.

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Editor: Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

, remains tied to the provisional, prosthetic identity of the woman under surveillance, and cannot therefore be transported outside the limits and protocols of the experiment. By constantly making us unsure about the face value of her textual and photographic statements, Calle seems to encourage in those who read and view her work a sense of its own incipient fictionality, even where its most overt claims are documentary or, in photographic terms, indexical. At the same time, however, it continues to sound as though it could still be ‘true’: the effect of truth, whether

in Women’s writing in contemporary France