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Spectators, aesthetics and encompletion
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This book discusses early modern English drama as a part of visual culture. It concerns the ideas about 'making and unmaking' that Shakespeare and his contemporaries may have known and formulated, and how these ideas relate to the author's own critical assumptions about early modern aesthetic experience. The study of drama as a part of visual culture offers the perfect context for an exploration of pre-modern aesthetic discourse. The book expounds the author's approach to plays as participants in a lively post-Reformation visual culture in the process of 're-formation'. It then focuses on the social meanings of patronage of the visual arts in a discussion of Paulina as patron of Hermione's image in The Winter's Tale. The discussion of The Winter's Tale pivots around the play's troubling investment in patriarchal notions of 'perfection'. The book also explores image-breaking in Robert Greene's Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. This play presents an instance of onstage iconoclasm in the supernatural destruction of a demonic brazen head, a quasi-magical figure that had been depicted in English literature since at least the twelfth century. In focusing on the portrayal of invisibility in The Two Merry Milkmaids, the book explores early modern preoccupation with processes of visual construction in a play in which there is very little artisanal activity.

Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

characters. In Christopher Marlowe’s Dr Faustus , meanwhile, spectators are encouraged to accept that Faustus has passed out of visibility when Mephistopheles ‘charms’ him so that he ‘may be invisible’. 3 Similarly, in The Two Merry Milkmaids , the anonymous comedy that is my central example in this chapter, a succession of characters are shown passing in and out of

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

there into the meanings of ‘completion’, ‘incompletion’ and ‘destruction’ in Campaspe (1584) and Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay (1589), before drawing out again to a discussion of concepts of erasure in an early-to-mid-seventeenth-century play, The Two Merry Milkmaids. This non-chronological ‘order’ that folds in on itself before unfolding back out again seems

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

pictures’ (p. 86, line 19). Consequently, examples in which dramatists grapple with the limitations of representational activity have been discussed here as a mode of problem-solving. This is the light in which I have viewed the deployment of defacement and erasure in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay and The Two Merry Milkmaids ; in addition, the evocation of the unknowability of Hermione’s image has

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The pleasure of reading comedies in early modern England
Hannah August

senses.14 This is why the printer’s MUP_Smith_Printer.indd 203 02/04/2015 16:18 204 Aesthetic sensory experiences address to the 1620 quarto of J.C.’s The Two Merry Milkmaids can claim that the comedy ‘was made more for the Eye, then the Eare; lesse for the Hand, then eyther’.15 The sensual pleasures inherent in this ‘Pleasant Comedie’ lay, according to the printer, in seeing and, to a lesser extent, hearing it performed – the printed book which the reader holds in his or her hand is not the play’s intended incarnation. The absence of sensory stimulation inherent

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Chloe Porter

function as onstage spectators. In The Winter’s Tale , Paulina is patron of the supposed statue of Hermione; in Lyly’s Campaspe , Alexander the Great commissions a portrait of Campaspe, while in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay , Friar Bacon oversees a demonic image-making process. Since The Two Merry Milkmaids concerns spectatorship within the visual field rather than of a specific artwork, there

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama