Search results

Pacifist feminism in Britain, 1870–1902
Author: Heloise Brown

This book explores the pervasive influence of pacifism on Victorian feminism. It provides an account of Victorian women who campaigned for peace, and of the many feminists who incorporated pacifist ideas into their writing on women and gender. The book explores feminists' ideas about the role of women within the empire, their eligibility for citizenship, and their ability to act as moral guardians in public life. It shows that such ideas made use – in varying ways – of gendered understandings of the role of force and the relevance of arbitration and other pacifist strategies. The book examines the work of a wide range of individuals and organisations, from well-known feminists such as Lydia Becker, Josephine Butler and Millicent Garrett Fawcett to lesser-known figures such as the Quaker pacifists Ellen Robinson and Priscilla Peckover.

Heloise Brown

the physical force objection 1 The physical force objection to women’s suffrage T he suffrage movement was a central strand in Victorian feminism, and one of its primary aims was confronting antisuffragists’ opposition to the enfranchisement of women. A principal argument for opponents of women’s suffrage was the physical force objection: the principle that women were unable to take up arms to defend their country, and therefore could not qualify for the franchise. In engaging with this question, many feminists began to approach the question of why and under

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Open Access (free)
Heloise Brown

comparison with Britain, although the British peace movement differed significantly from that of the Continental Europeans in its approach to women’s pacifism. Leila J. Rupp has focused on the growth of international women’s organisations, beginning with 179 ‘ the truest form of patriotism ’ the International Council of Women in 1888 and continuing into the twentieth century with the International Woman Suffrage Alliance and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. Although she does not focus in detail on Victorian feminism or the interrelations between

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Open Access (free)
Pacifism and feminism in Victorian Britain
Heloise Brown

‘women’ and ‘peace’. Much work has been done on women pacifists during the First World War, and in relation to women’s resistance to the presence of nuclear weapons in Britain, particularly regarding the Greenham Common missile base, in the 1980s. Yet, in its early years, organised feminism in Britain also demonstrated a concern with pacifism and the issue of women’s (imagined) relationship to peace. This book charts the development of these debates within the Victorian feminist movement to illustrate the centrality of such ideas to many strands of late Victorian

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Heloise Brown

concentration camps were intended to make survival impossible for the guerrillas. In practice, they not only further angered them, but they relieved them of family responsibilities and possibly facilitated the continuation of the resistance. The internment of women and children meant that the war was divisive 164 feminist responses to the anglo-boer war for the British feminist movement, and produced a range of responses, both pro- and anti-war, due to Victorian feminism’s complex relationship to liberalism and imperialism. The most public feminist involvement in the

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Feminist journals and peace questions
Heloise Brown

pitiless logic; she would leave nothing but shreds behind’.32 Barbara Caine has contrasted Fenwick Miller’s Signal with the contemporary Shafts, arguing that in the context of the 1890s the Signal was relatively unfashionable, perhaps even outdated. It did indeed struggle with the concept of the ‘New Woman’ during the late 1890s, as Caine has discussed, and maintained strong links with mid-Victorian feminism. It dealt with new issues, such as rational dress and cycling clubs, but it is arguable whether, as Caine suggests, it really ‘could not take on board with any ease

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Open Access (free)
The International Arbitration and Peace Association
Heloise Brown

the Pale: White Women, Racism and History (London: Verso, 1992), pp. 209 –11, 217–18; Marian Ramelson, Petticoat Rebellion: A Century of Struggle for Women’s Rights (London: Lawrence and Wishart, 1967), p. 96; Philippa Levine, Victorian Feminism 1850–1900 (London: Century Hutchinson, 1987), p. 115; Review (15 April 1889), p. 186. 41 WPP (16 March 1889) in Bland, Banishing the Beast, p. 44; Walkowitz, City of Dreadful Delight, p. 68. 42 Journal (31 July 1886), pp. 76–7. 43 Ibid. 44 Journal (31 July 1886), p. 77; John Ruskin, The Crown of Wild Olive: Four Lectures on

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Charlotte Dale

, Bedside Seductions:  Nursing and the Victorian Imagination, 1830–1880 (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1998), among others. 78 Nurses during the Anglo-Boer War 26 J. Hallam, Nursing the Image:  Media, Culture and Professional Identity (London: Routledge, 2000), p. 20. 27 P. Levine, Victorian Feminism 1850–1900 (London:  Hutchinson Education, 1987), p.  129; T.  M. Group and J.  I. Roberts, Nursing, Physician Control, and the Medical Monopoly: Historical Perspectives on Gendered Inequality in Roles, Rights, and Range of Practice (Bloomington, IN:  Indiana University Press

in Colonial caring