Pacifist feminism in Britain, 1870–1902
Author: Heloise Brown

This book explores the pervasive influence of pacifism on Victorian feminism. It provides an account of Victorian women who campaigned for peace, and of the many feminists who incorporated pacifist ideas into their writing on women and gender. The book explores feminists' ideas about the role of women within the empire, their eligibility for citizenship, and their ability to act as moral guardians in public life. It shows that such ideas made use – in varying ways – of gendered understandings of the role of force and the relevance of arbitration and other pacifist strategies. The book examines the work of a wide range of individuals and organisations, from well-known feminists such as Lydia Becker, Josephine Butler and Millicent Garrett Fawcett to lesser-known figures such as the Quaker pacifists Ellen Robinson and Priscilla Peckover.

Open Access (free)
Heloise Brown

conclusion Conclusion Within the historiography of pacifist feminism, there has been a general reluctance to look further back than the First World War. The wide range of literature on the Victorian women’s movement which has been produced over the last twenty years has either neglected the fact that many feminists were active in campaigns for international peace, or has listed ‘peace’ as a women’s issue during the late nineteenth century without offering any further analysis of how women were involved, or what they did in this connection.1 The obvious exception

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Feminist journals and peace questions
Heloise Brown

and internationalist interests. The Women’s Penny Paper exhibited a more ‘[l]ively and uncompromising feminism’ than either the Review or the WSJ, and Doughan and Sanchez have characterised it as ‘the most vigorous feminist paper of its time’.3 It contained information and debates on a wide range of feminist campaigns, as well as biographical interviews with leading feminists, and constitutes an invaluable resource for the historian of the Victorian women’s movement. The Woman’s Signal was likewise concerned with a much broader range of feminist topics than the

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Charlotte Dale

Literary Study of Women in British Industries and Professions 1832–1850 (London:  George 80 Nurses during the Anglo-Boer War Allen and Unwin Ltd, 1966), p.  74; Dingwall et  al., An Introduction to the Social History of Nursing, p. 58; L. Pykett, ‘Portraits of the artist as a young woman:  representations of the female artist in the New Woman fiction of the 1890s’, in N.  D. Thompson (ed.), Victorian Women Writers and the Woman Question (Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press, 1999), p.  144; J.  Hedgecock, The Femme Fatale in Victorian Literature:  The Danger and the

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Pacifism and feminism in Victorian Britain
Heloise Brown

that made pacifist ideas fundamentally useful for feminism. Because both theories could be based upon arguments about the (mis)use of power and the importance of morality, and both could accommodate a wide range of political perspectives, many feminists during the early phase of the movement were attracted to pacifist rhetoric and principles. As a prominent, but hitherto neglected, aspect of the Victorian women’s movement, it is important to understand why many feminists employed peace arguments, often relying upon the construction of femininity as passive and even

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
British women in international politics
Heloise Brown

international organisation could be imagined, it was limited in its impact upon feminism in Britain. By the late 1890s it had been transformed from its origins as a radical suffragist movement into a social reform organisation. As a result, the internationalism that formed part of the feminist politics of some Victorian women did not find a means for expression within the ICW. It was restricted both by its internal dynamics and the logistical problems of working internationally. However, despite its conservatism and the emphasis that was placed on homogeneity, it did offer a

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Women performers and the law in the ‘long’ Edwardian period
Viv Gardner

fortune”: The Jersey Lily and Models of Nineteenth-century Fame’, in Su Holmes and Diane Negra, eds, The Limelight and Under the Microsope: Forms and Functions of Female Celebrity, London: Continuum, pp. 17–36. Hoare, Philip (1997), Oscar Wilde’s Last Stand, New York: Arcade Publishing. Jupp, James (1923), The Gaiety Stage Door, London: Jonathan Cape. Kettle, Michael (1977), Salome’s Last Veil: The Libel Case of the Century, London: Granada. Loeb, Lori Anne (1994), Consuming Angels: Advertising and Victorian Women, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Medd, Jodie (2002

in Stage women, 1900–50
Open Access (free)
Collecting contacts with Gabrielle Enthoven
Kate Dorney

Victorian Women, London: Routledge, pp. 94–116. Laver, James (1930), ‘Sphere of Books’, The Sphere, 12 April 1930, p. 82. Laver, James (1952), ‘Gabrielle Enthoven’, in Studies in English Theatre History: In Memory of Gabrielle Enthoven, O.B.E., First President of the Society for Theatre Research, 1948–1950, London: Society for Theatre Research, pp. 1–9. Lesley, Cole (1976), The Life of Noël Coward, London: Penguin. Morley, Sheridan (1974), A Talent to Amuse: A Biography of Noël Coward, London: Penguin. Nash, George (1956), ‘Talk on the Gabrielle Enthoven Theatre

in Stage women, 1900–50
Coreen Anne McGuire

Victorian women remained mysterious to him, Hutchinson chose to use the vital capacity of men as standard for women rather than making separate studies. However, this was an unusual move to make in a medical milieu fascinated by the science of difference. Others soon called for representative studies to clarify the normal range of vital capacity in women. The influential statistician and eugenicist Francis Galton (discussed in Chapter 1 ), for instance, separated his anthropometric studies by sex, as in the 1883 Final Report of the Anthropometric Committee of the British

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

persists at the ending of the novel is imagery of bondage, chillingly domesticated and civilized’ (187). 111 Susan Meyer, Imperialism at Home: Race and Victorian Women’s Fiction (Ithaca, NY and London: Cornell University Press, 1996), pp. 98–9. 112

in Gothic incest