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James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the Civil Rights Revolution
 Linfield University

Born in New York City only fifteen months apart, the Harlem-raised James Baldwin and the privileged William F. Buckley, Jr. could not have been more different, but they both rose to the height of American intellectual life during the civil rights movement. By the time they met in February 1965 to debate race and the American Dream at the Cambridge Union, Buckley—a founding father of the American conservative movement—was determined to sound the alarm about a man he considered an “eloquent menace.” For his part, Baldwin viewed Buckley as a deluded reactionary whose popularity revealed the sickness of the American soul. The stage was set for an epic confrontation that pitted Baldwin’s call for a moral revolution in race relations against Buckley’s unabashed elitism and implicit commitment to white supremacy. In this article I introduce readers to the story at the heart of my new book about Baldwin and Buckley, The Fire Is Upon Us.

James Baldwin Review
James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the 1965 Cambridge Debate
Daniel Robert McClure

The 1965 debate at Cambridge University between James Baldwin and William F. Buckley, Jr., posed the question: “Has the American Dream been achieved at the Expense of the American Negro?” Within the contours of the debate, Baldwin and Buckley wrestled with the ghosts of settler colonialism and slavery in a nation founded on freedom and equality. Framing the debate within the longue durée, this essay examines the deep cultural currents related to the American racial paradox at the height of the Civil Rights movement. Underscoring the changing language of white resistance against black civil rights, the essay argues that the Baldwin and Buckley debate anticipated the ways the U.S. would address racial inequality in the aftermath of the civil rights era and the dawn of neoliberalism in the 1970s.

James Baldwin Review
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@gettysburg.edu 09 2016 2 2 1 1 6 6 27 27 10.7227/JBR.2.2 “To Crush the Serpent” James Baldwin, the Religious Right, and the Moral Minority Vogel Joseph vogelj@merrimack.edu 09 2016 2 2 1 1 28 28 48 48 10.7227/JBR.2.3 Possessing History and American Innocence James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the 1965 Cambridge Debate McClure Daniel Robert dmcclure@Exchange.FULLERTON.EDU 09 2016 2 2

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6 6 1 1 Introduction To Minimize the Bill That They Must Pay Joyce Justin A. 29 9 2020 6 6 1 1 1 1 12 12 1 10.7227/JBR.6.1 Feature Essays The Great Debate James Baldwin, William F. Buckley, Jr., and the Civil Rights Revolution University  Linfield 29 9 2020 6 6 1 1

From universalisation to relativism
David Bruce MacDonald

. 192. Even though they may be lacking in a specific national agenda, the right-wing American pundit William F. Buckley has also attacked all those who label as anti-Semitic any and all who criticise Israel. This has made Buckley question whether ‘the shadow of the Holocaust has been made to stretch too far in contemporary polemics’. Buckley divides Jews who discuss the Holocaust into two groups: ‘There are Jews who continue to fear that the fires that lit the Holocaust might one day be rekindled. But there are also Jews who, comfortable with the protocols built up

in Balkan holocausts?