witchcraft accusations in the period, therefore, this chapter also provides a general survey of the published work on the subject for an English audience. As the reader will find, this requires considerable interdisciplinary awareness. Although historians, folklorists and anthropologists often find themselves in the same field of study, they rarely follow the same path across it. Despite a wealth of information, historians have

in Witchcraft Continued
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

was terrible. They were about to kill. They even told us ‘If you are going to give treatment to government soldiers, you, MSF people, you will be in danger’. The soldiers’ threats went beyond the provision of medical care, with accusations recounted by another staff member that ‘anyone that stayed in Bentiu under government control were traitors’ ( Médecins Sans Frontières, 2014d ). When the killing began, it proved nonetheless to be selective

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Rothenburg, 1561–1652

Given the widespread belief in witchcraft and the existence of laws against such practices, why did witch-trials fail to gain momentum and escalate into ‘witch-crazes’ in certain parts of early modern Europe? This book answers this question by examining the rich legal records of the German city of Rothenburg ob der Tauber, a city that experienced a very restrained pattern of witch-trials and just one execution for witchcraft between 1561 and 1652. The book explores the factors that explain the absence of a ‘witch-craze’ in Rothenburg, placing particular emphasis on the interaction of elite and popular priorities in the pursuit (and non-pursuit) of alleged witches at law. By making the witchcraft narratives told by the peasants and townspeople of Rothenburg central to its analysis, the book also explores the social and psychological conflicts that lay behind the making of accusations and confessions of witchcraft. Furthermore, it challenges the existing explanations for the gender-bias of witch-trials, and also offers insights into other areas of early modern life, such as experiences of and beliefs about communal conflict, magic, motherhood, childhood and illness. Written in a narrative style, the study invites a wide readership to share in the drama of early modern witch trials.

The attempted trial of Boniface VIII 6 The attempted trial of Boniface VIII for heresy1 Jeffrey Denton Despite strenuous efforts by the French Crown and its allies over a period of eight years Boniface VIII was not ultimately tried. Legal procedures for a trial were put in motion in 1303, in an attempt to summon the pope before a General Council of the Church; and later, after his death in October 1303, as the accusations continued to grow, there was a protracted quest to persuade the new French pope, Clement V, to condemn Boniface posthumously. Over the

in Judicial tribunals in England and Europe, 1200–1700
Open Access (free)
Popular magic in modern Europe

The study of witchcraft accusations in Europe during the period after the end of the witch trials is still in its infancy. Witches were scratched in England, swum in Germany, beaten in the Netherlands and shot in France. The continued widespread belief in witchcraft and magic in nineteenth- and twentieth-century France has received considerable academic attention. The book discusses the extent and nature of witchcraft accusations in the period and provides a general survey of the published work on the subject for an English audience. It explores the presence of magical elements in everyday life during the modern period in Spain. The book provides a general overview of vernacular magical beliefs and practices in Italy from the time of unification to the present, with particular attention to how these traditions have been studied. By functioning as mechanisms of social ethos and control, narratives of magical harm were assured a place at the very heart of rural Finnish social dynamics into the twentieth century. The book draws upon over 300 narratives recorded in rural Finland in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that provide information concerning the social relations, tensions and strategies that framed sorcery and the counter-magic employed against it. It is concerned with a special form of witchcraft that is practised only amongst Hungarians living in Transylvania.

Magic, witchcraft and Church in early eighteenth-century Capua

2 Beyond the witch trials Magic, witchcraft and Church in Capua Pro exoneratione sua propria coscientia: magic, witchcraft and Church in early eighteenth-century Capua Augusto Ferraiuolo The following discussion is concerned with accusations of magic, which were formalised as denunciations heard by the Inquisition of the Archdiocese of Capua, a city twelve miles north of Naples, during the first half of the eighteenth century. What the following discussion will not be doing is providing a detailed socio-cultural exploration of the magical practices and the

in Beyond the witch trials
Open Access (free)

96 v 3 v Male misconduct Men suspected of misconduct were often high-​profile individuals in positions of authority. Municipal, administrative forms of misconduct –​ roughly analogous to what Nivet calls ‘political collaboration’1  –​ were taken seriously by the French authorities after the liberation. Members of the Gendarmerie Nationale and the Commissariat Spécial of Lille carried out time-​consuming investigations up to the end of 1919. All but two of these involved accusations of questionable occupation conduct on the part of the Mayor, the Municipal

in The experience of occupation in the Nord, 1914– 18
Open Access (free)

readings of the exceptionally rich records from the Rothenburg witchtrials to explore the social and psychic tensions that lay behind the making of witchcraft accusations and confessions, the popular and elite reactions to these accusations and confessions, and the ways in which participants in witch-trials pursued strategies, expressed emotions and negotiated conflicts through what they said about witchcraft. These aims are important for various reasons. In 1996, Robin Briggs suggested that what was surprising about the early modern period was not how many people were

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Open Access (free)
A male strategy

French in 1702 and listed the twenty-eight demands in the satanic contract, including the dismissal of an accusation of murder made against Montmorency. As with Faust, the chapbooks mixed fact and fantasy. One edition stated Montmorency made the pact while in the Bastille, for example. Montmorency had indeed spent a few months in the Bastille in 1679–80 after having been implicated in a notorious aristocratic poisoning scandal – thus the reference to the murder accusations, but in the wrong decade. The influence of the Montmorency legend is apparent from the fact that

in Beyond the witch trials

than blood ties was the fact that the Eastern Finnish and Karelian farming household ideally comprised a fundamental ‘eating community’, an aggregate which was seen to function as a single unit of social and economic production and consumption. Descriptions of sorcery make it clear that in rural-traditional Finnish communities suspicions and accusations of sorcery tended above all to reinforce the

in Witchcraft Continued