Toby Fricker

the rapid influx of people, the Jordanian government opened Za’atari refugee camp in late July 2012, with support from the Jordan Hashemite Charity Organisation, United Nations agencies and other partners. 3 In the harsh conditions of Jordan’s northern desert, Za’atari rapidly became a massive aid operation and at the same time the media face of not only the refugee crisis in Jordan but across the

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
David Barling

chap 5 13/8/04 4:22 pm Page 108 5 Food agencies as an institutional response to policy failure by the UK and the EU David Barling Introduction The UK public’s confidence in the quality of the modern food supply, and in the governance of that supply, took a buffeting through a series of food safety crises in the 1980s and 1990s. The much-quoted list ranged from pesticide residues to salmonella in eggs, to BSE (which was estimated as a cost of over £4 billion to the public purse) and E.coli 0157. The internal market of the EU shared in some of those incidents

in Qualities of food
Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector
Miriam Bradley

Introduction In contemporary crises, a key aim of international humanitarian action is the protection of the civilian population. In the same contexts in which the protection needs of the local population are greatest, staff members of international humanitarian agencies may also come under threat themselves. Thus the organisations that seek to keep the local civilian population safe from physical violence are at the same time seeking to keep

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

Introduction With the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA) having run a deficit almost since the start of its operations in 1950, the US’s decision – as UNRWA’s erstwhile primary funder – to cut its financial support for the Agency is having a significant impact both on UNRWA and over five million Palestinian refugees living across UNRWA’s five areas of operation in the Middle East: Lebanon, Jordan, Syria, Gaza and the West Bank. This article explores UNRWA’s responses to this dramatic cut in funding; more

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Uses and Misuses of International Humanitarian Law and Humanitarian Principles
Rony Brauman

respecting the first two. Leaving aside the aforementioned fact that a national Red Cross society cannot be both an auxiliary of the government and independent of it, let us look at the meaning and limits of the concept for NGOs. Most NGOs are funded by institutional donors (the EU’s European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID), etc.) and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Framework for Measuring Effectiveness in Humanitarian Response
Vincenzo Bollettino and Birthe Anders

time-sensitive, common goal (saving lives, particularly in the crucial first days after a disaster) ( Forestier et al. , 2016 ). However, that does not mean that there are no challenges to civil–military coordination, not least when a large number of actors respond. An example of this is the 2008 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami in Aceh, Indonesia, to which a reported 14 UN agencies, 16 foreign militaries and 195 foreign humanitarian organisations were involved in humanitarian assistance ( Wiharta et al. , 2008 ). However, challenges in disaster responses are

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

President Vladimir Putin oversees extensive, precise, disruptive fake-information campaigns that are designed to cause confusion ( Paul & Matthews, 2016 ). At Russia’s ‘Internet Research Agency’, hundreds of employees write content for false blogs and social media accounts. These are then mobilised to create disinformation campaigns about issues ranging from the conflicts in Syria and the Ukraine to an invented explosion at a chemical plant in Centerville, Louisiana ( Chen, 2015 ). MIT media researcher Ethan Zuckerman calls this content

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

, suggests that the promotion of self-reliance through vocational training and entrepreneurship programmes has become the new neoliberal mantra also among refugee-supporting agencies, policymakers and different humanitarian actors ( Easton-Calabria and Omata, 2018 ; Turner, 2019 ; Richey and Brockington, 2020 ). Yet, little attention has been devoted to exploring how the discourse of entrepreneurship is mobilised for the presumed benefit of refugee women in the realm of humanitarian governance, here

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sean Healy and Victoria Russell

-immigrant fringes, was bolstered by the statements of the European border control agency Frontex, caught fire on social media, was then repeated by major media outlets, politicians and prosecutors, and eventually became policy of the then-government of Italy, under Interior Minister Matteo Salvini. It achieved its moment of (temporary) victory in 2018 with the closing of Italian ports to NGO vessels and the halting of search and rescue operations by NGOs on the Mediterranean. The

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Bert Ingelaere

an assemblage. 3 I borrow this concept from the philosophers Deleuze and Guattari as they coined it in A Thousand Plateaus ( 2004 ). They introduce the concept of agencement that is generally translated as assemblage in English to capture the intricate interplay of agency and structure, contingency and structuration, change and organisation. 4 Important is the fact that ‘assemblages select elements from the milieus (the surroundings, the context, the mediums) in which the assemblages work’ ( Macgregor Wise, 2005 : 78). Therefore, it is needed to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs