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Staff Security and Civilian Protection in the Humanitarian Sector

vulnerability rather than context-specific vulnerability analysis, and that national staff are frequently offered lesser protections than expatriate staff, even where they face greater risks ( Carpenter, 2003 ; Dolan and Hovil, 2006 ; Stoddard et al. , 2011 ). Furthermore, a 2011 UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) report on ‘good practice for humanitarians in complex security environments’ acknowledges that local civilians ‘suffer most from conflict and violence’ and makes the case for aid-worker security measures not in terms of differential

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

people with security experience in the private sector and the military; my curriculum vitae did not interest them at first. My standard humanitarian career path in NGOs and international organisations meant I had only a few months’ experience in that type of position. However, my 2002 Master’s memoire on aid workerssecurity in Afghanistan (‘Quelle place pour la compréhension dans la trilogie: acceptabilité, protection et dissuasion?’ 1 ) gave me the justification I needed to apply. I ultimately got an interview, after resubmitting my application and calling a few

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs