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The interest in aesthetics in philosophy, literary and cultural studies is growing rapidly. This book contains exemplary essays by key practitioners in these fields which demonstrate the importance of this area of enquiry. New aestheticism remains a troubled term and in current parlance it already comes loaded with the baggage of the 'philistine controversy' which first emerged in an exchange that originally that took place in the New Left Review during the mid-1990s. A serious aesthetic education is necessary for resisting the advance of 'philistinism'. Contemporary aesthetic production may be decentred and belonging to the past, but that is not a reason to underestimate what great works do that nothing else can. Despite well-established feminist work in literary criticism, film theory and art history, feminist aesthetics 'is a relatively young discipline, dating from the early 1990s'. The book focuses on the critical interrogation of the historical status of mimesis in the context of a gendered and racial politics of modernity. Throughout the history of literary and art criticism the focus has fallen on the creation or reception of works and texts. The book also identifies a fragmentary Romantic residue in contemporary aesthetics. The Alexandrian aesthetic underlies the experience of the 'allegorical'. 'Cultural poetics' makes clear the expansion of 'poetics' into a domain that is no longer strictly associated with 'poetry'. The book also presents an account of a Kantian aesthetic criticism, discussing Critique of Pure Reason, Critique of Aesthetic Judgement and Critique of Judgement.

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From content warning to censorship

’s professors were undergraduates and graduate students, classrooms were very different places. Wooden desks screwed to the floor were the norm rather than light and mobile desks on wheels. Professors lectured in poorly lit and poorly ventilated great halls, and students wrote notes by hand and could only fact check later by taking laborious trips to the library. People smoked in classrooms, for God’s sake! Visual imagery in the art history classroom depended upon carousels of slides, and film courses depended upon after-​hours screenings of mostly canonical films. And now

in The power of vulnerability

Languir’s compelling art history of childhood, Imagining Childhood , offers us an important reflection in its concluding line that images in the Western tradition have ‘always made plain that we are all childlike’. 55 Our ethical encounter with our own children is always an ethical encounter with our own childhoods. If contemporary parenting cultures turn us inwards, and if political consumption leads

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Feminist aesthetics, negativity and semblance

3 Ewa Plonowska Ziarek Mimesis in black and white: feminist aesthetics, negativity and semblance As Sarah Worth suggests, despite well-established feminist work in literary criticism, film theory and art history, feminist aesthetics ‘is a relatively young discipline, dating from the early 1990s’, and thus still open to contestation and new formulations.1 In this context it might seem paradoxical that one of the founding texts of feminist aesthetics, Rita Felski’s Beyond Feminist Aesthetics: Feminist Literature and Social Change, proclaims its impossibility

in The new aestheticism
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with the colour model) the image, confronting us in grey and perhaps also blurred, makes us think differently about its moral and political content, as well as its nature as painting and representation – a familiar avant-garde strategy. When I think about it, too, my academic life over more than thirty-five years was always somewhere between disciplines – sociology, cultural studies, art history, aesthetics – and institutionally nearly always in an interdisciplinary unit or project. A scholarly dilettantism (shared with many colleagues and friends over the years

in Austerity baby
The key role of the Italian antiquarian market in the inception of American Classical art collections during the late-nineteenth century

3 ‘More for beauty than for rarity’: the key role of the Italian antiquarian market in the inception of American Classical art collections during the late-nineteenth century Francesca de Tomasi Introduction It is very surprising that there has been a buyer of such vases unless we assume that they were destined for some American museum; since everybody knows that the Americans, without any particular knowledge of art history and without leaving their country of origin, buy art on commission. They trust the archaeological knowledge of the people they appoint for

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
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Working memory

Claire Cochrane and Jo Robinson (eds), Theatre History and Historiography: Ethics, Evidence and Truth (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), 147–62; Heike Roms, ‘Mind the Gaps: Evidencing Performance and Performing Evidence in Performance Art History,’ in Claire Cochrane and Jo Robinson (eds), Theatre History and Historiography: Ethics, Evidence and Truth (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), 163–81; and Rebecca Schneider, Performing Remains: Art and War in Times of Theatrical Reenactment (New York: Routledge, 2011).  7 See Jean Fourastié, Les trente glorieuses

in Street theatre and the production of postindustrial space
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have looked to influential scholars of art history and visual culture, especially those with interests in the history of medicine and the medical humanities. 57 Championing visual approaches to enrich our understanding of medicine, as Jordanova has called for, Soaking Up the Rays urges scholars with an interest in medical history to pay closer attention to its visual culture. This book

in Soaking up the rays
The ends of incompletion

Romanticism , Bettie Allison Rand Lectures in Art History (Chapel Hill and London: University of North Carolina Press, 2005 ), pp. 1–35, p. 19. 81 See Hamling, Decorating the ‘Godly’ Household , p. in 192. 82 For the dating of this panel see Hamling

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
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Towards a teleological model of nationalism

their own national history. Smith, perhaps as a result of his own classics and art history background, has seen nationalism as a secular and aesthetic phenomenon, one that relies heavily on myths of the Golden Age. These are further buttressed by ‘the foundation charter’, and ‘ethnic title deeds’, derived from a nation’s long attachment to the land.33 Such reasoning is similar to that of Pfaff, Alter, Kečmanović and Schöpflin, but has many notable differences. For Smith, the Golden Age is the central component of nationalism and national identity. It promises ‘a

in Balkan holocausts?