An anthology

This is a companion to Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance: An anthology (2016), the largest ever collection of its kind. The monograph-length Introduction traces the course of pastoral from antiquity to the present day. The historical account is woven into a thematic map of the richly varied pastoral mode, and it is linked to the social context, not only by local allegory and allusion but by its deeper origins and affinities. English Renaissance pastoral is set within the context of this total perspective.

Besides the formal eclogue, the study covers many genres: lyric, epode, georgic, country-house poem, ballad, romantic epic, drama and prose romance. Major practitioners like Theocritus, Virgil, Sidney, Spenser, Drayton and Milton are discussed individually.

The Introduction also charts the many means by which pastoral texts circulated during the Renaissance, with implications for the history and reception of all Early Modern poetry. The poems in the Anthology have been edited from the original manuscripts and early printed texts, and the Textual Notes comprehensively document the sources and variant readings. There are also notes on the poets and analytical indices of themes, genres, and various categories of proper names. Seldom, if ever, has a cross-section of English Renaissance poetry been textually annotated in such detail.

Customary society and oral culture in rural England, 1700–1900
Bob Bushaway

place by word of mouth. Social venues and occasions exist for the expression and transmission of oral culture.17 The social environment is conducive to forming and using memory tools such as formulaic songs and rituals. Clare wrote: ‘I heard my mother’s memory tell’ as if memory itself was empowered with the possibility of speech. ‘In simple prose or simpler rhymes’ he recounts that she retold stories from her own experience, or from local tales, or from popular stories common in chapbook or ballad literature.18 Modes of work and leisure in the English countryside

in The spoken word
Kirsti Bohata, Alexandra Jones, Mike Mantin, and Steven Thompson

marginalisation for disabled miners. The ‘cripples’ whom Dückershoff witnessed begging in the street were not only located in an interstitial space, between the home and the institutions of the public sphere, but were also located in the interstices of the economy, forced to resort to begging to obtain some sort of income. Another example of such a combination are the disabled ballad singers who performed in the street to earn an income, many of them in coalfield districts and some of them former miners.89 Ballad culture was strongest in pre-literate communities, before the

in Disability in industrial Britain
Open Access (free)
Cultural geographies of poetry in colonial Aotearoa
Nikki Hessell

to the British Empire, Meredith Martin has pointed out the ways in which the imperial periphery and its subjects were central to the conception of the Lays volume, which she reads ‘as a bridge between late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century romantic ideas of poetry, imagined primitive communities and fragmentary history, and later revivals of these ideas’. 21 In an instantiation of what Martin calls ‘the ballad-theory of civilization’, Macaulay’s poems aim at a universal ballad history, woven into the fabric of all societies and thus feeding and shaping a

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Cautionary tales and oral tradition in early modern England
Alexandra Walsham

Lincolnshire swearer are cases in point: a version of the latter story can be found in Richard Whitford’s Werke for Householders (1531) and, like the monstrous child, almost certainly has even earlier antecedents.43 Post-Reformation anthologies of providences grew in the same way as their Catholic precursors, by being constantly augmented by topical examples. Many of these came from blackletter broadside ballads and pamphlets which functioned as forerunners of the newspaper, and from the popular chronicles and plays which were parasitic upon them. Edmund Bicknoll, author of

in The spoken word
Open Access (free)
Adam Fox and Daniel Woolf

in the early 1750s she passed on ‘her songs and tales of chivalry and love’ to her young niece, Anna Gordon. Anna probably learned these ballads before she could read and write and even when, much later in life, she came to set them down, she did so ‘entirely from recollection’, for, she confessed, ‘I never saw one of them in print or manuscript; but I learned them all when a child, by hearing them sung by . . . Mrs Farquharson, by my own mother, and an old maid-servant that had long been in the family’. In total, Anna Gordon, or Mrs Brown as she became, wrote out

in The spoken word
Open Access (free)
Sukanta Chaudhuri

–Royalist divide, as with so many others, opposite sides employ the same pastoral tropes and metaphoric strategies to their contrary ends. This is most piquantly shown in the persistent use of the pastoral to mourn the death of Charles I. One such instance masquerades in ballad form as ‘Jack the Plough-lad’s Lamentation’. Another is composed long after the Restoration by Anthony Spinedge, born three years after Charles’s execution. Earlier, Royalist pastoral had been largely confined to a species of privileged artifice, even where it carried direct political allusion. Clearly

in Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance
Barbery, earwax and snip-snaps
Eleanor Decamp

representation, how do these identification tags function autonomously? In one seventeenth-century ballad barbery is characterized by sound alone: ‘The Barber goes snip snap.’57 This soundmark is not the creative device of a single balladeer. In the period, this barbery soundmark echoes across different literary media in a range of contexts, making it culturally stable. ‘Snip snap’, ‘snap’, ‘snip’, ‘snipsnap’, ‘snip-snap’, ‘snipping’ and ‘snapping’ as well as associative ‘knacking’ sounds are commonplace. ‘Snip-snap’ and ‘knack’ hover between various acoustic contexts and

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Open Access (free)
Where postcolonialism is neo-orientalist – the cases of Sarojini Naidu and Arundhati Roy
Elleke Boehmer

BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 158 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job 9 East is east: where postcolonialism is neo-orientalist – the cases of Sarojini Naidu and Arundhati Roy Oh, East is East and West is West, and never the twain shall meet. (Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Ballad of East and West’, 1892)1 This chapter, which considers the continuing exoticisation of the other woman that is involved in the postcolonial privileging of her voice, begins with a symptomatic account of the remarkable critical reception in 1890s London of Sarojini

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Kirsti Bohata, Alexandra Jones, Mike Mantin, and Steven Thompson

assessment, he would have joined a long queue of men with injuries and ailments that required treatment or certification. If he attended any of the regular meetings of his colliery trade union lodge, he would have heard accounts of numerous cases very similar to his own in which liability was denied by the coal company and the trade union was forced to decide how to assist their stricken member. In the cultural sphere, he would hear of disabling accidents in ballads and, though it would be a few more years before his fellow colliers began to fictionalise his experience

in Disability in industrial Britain