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Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design

growing influence of ‘behavioural economics’ ( Alcock, 2016 ). Before its sobering escape into the wild, as evinced in the Trump election and Brexit referendum ( Cadwalladr, 2017 ), behavioural economics had been popularised as ‘nudge politics’. Despite raising democratic concerns in targeting the sub-conscious, it has found favour among many Western governments. 5 Behavioural economics operationalises late-capitalism’s logistical requirement for people and things to be in the right place at the right time 24/7 ( Srnicek, 2016 ). Humanitarian

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
A multidisciplinary perspective

literature does not seem to be surprising, since they present rather large challenges to standard consumption and preference theory. However, Kelvin Lancaster (1966) managed to fit the adoption of new consumer goods within a neoclassical framework. In the next section his approach is assessed and related to recent approaches addressing the same phenomenon from a behavioural economics perspective, allowing for preference change. While preference change no longer seems to be a non-issue for economists, the question for the biological foundations enabling and constraining

in Innovation by demand

competition authority chair Lord Currie explains: At the heart of behavioural economics is the insight that ordinary consumers do not behave as the so-called perfectly rational consumer of neoclassical economics … Thus, for example: we have

in Network neutrality
Scale of demand and the role of competences

applications tools) accounted for 37 per cent of all software revenues in the UK, compared to 32 per cent for all of Europe. In the UK these are magazines such as PC World. References Athreye, S. S. (2001) ‘Competition, rivalry and innovative behaviour’, Economics of Innovation and New Technology, 10(1), pp. 1–22. Grindley, P. (1996), ‘The future of the software industry in the United Kingdom: the limitations of independent production’, in Mowery, D. C. (ed.), The International Software Industry: A Comparative Study of Industry Evolution and Structure, New York and Oxford

in Market relations and the competitive process

), ‘Statistical mechanics approaches to socioeconomic behaviour’, in Arthur, W. B., Durlauf, S. N., and Lane, D. (eds), The Economy as a Complex Evolving System II, Redwood City CA, Addison-Wesley. Earl, P. E. (1986), Lifestyle Economics: consumer behaviour in a turbulent world, Brighton, Wheatsheaf. Earl, P. E., ed. (1988a), Psychological Economics: development, tensions, prospects, Boston MA, Kluwer. Earl, P. E., ed. (1988b), Behavioural Economics, Aldershot, Elgar. Epstein, J. M., and Axtell, R. L. (1996), Growing Artificial Societies: social science from the bottom up

in Innovation by demand

guaranteed wherever traffic management occurs … Developing some basic principles around transparency, and ensuring that operators and ISPs comply with these principles, is consistent with our broader functions and duties as a sector regulator. 39 The analysis of behavioural

in Network neutrality