Search results

Sara Wong

‘impact’ and ‘capacity building’ in conflict research from often unidirectional conceptualisations (i.e. skills and knowledge flowing from the ‘Global North’ to the ‘Global South’), to a more complex picture of mutual learning and knowledge exchange. While our key objective, as situated within a wider international research project, was to create a locally relevant ‘creative research output’, I suggest that a significant ‘impact’ made through our collaboration was in the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Community–university research partnerships in global perspectives

This book is based on a three-year international comparative study on poverty reduction and sustainability strategies . It provides evidence from twenty case studies around the world on the power and potential of community and higher education based scholars and activists working together in the co-creation of transformative knowledge. Opening with a theoretical overview of knowledge, democracy and action, the book is followed by analytical chapters providing lessons learned and capacity building, and on the theory and practice of community university research partnerships. It also includes lessons on models of evaluation, approaches to measuring the impact and an agenda for future research and policy recommendations. The book overviews the concept of engaged scholarship and then moves to focus on community-university research partnerships. It is based on a global empirical study of the role of community-university research partnerships within the context of poverty alleviation, the creation of sustainable societies and, broadly speaking, the Millennium Development Goals. The book frames the contribution of community-university research partnerships within a larger knowledge democracy framework, linking this practice to other spaces of knowledge democracy. These include the open access movement, new acceptance of the methods of community-based and participatory research and the call for cognitive justice or the need for epistemologies of the Global South. It takes a particular look at the variety of structures that have been created in the various universities and civil society research organizations to facilitate and enhance research partnerships.

Open Access (free)
Phoebe Shambaugh
and
Bertrand Taithe

field report submitted by Sara Wong on the artist-academic collaborative project PostiveNegatives and the Drugs & (dis)order project foregrounds the questions of authorship, knowledge production and power relations suggested in the research articles. The report reflects critically on one of the group’s creative collaborations – part of the Drugs and (dis)order project in Colombia – and particularly on the interpersonal relations and questions of capacity building and learning which form part of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Batman Saves the Congo: How Celebrities Disrupt the Politics of Development
Alexandra Cosima Budabin
and
Lisa Ann Richey

conflict-mineral narrative and the Dodd–Frank Act. In Ben Affleck and the ECI’s story to do development through good business, the Northeastern province becomes a place that needs and is open for other kinds of trade in ‘conflict-free’ commodities. But, to recover this, it also needs investment and capacity building which American brands can support by investing and providing for through CSR. As such, besides the ‘positive’ discursive turn, there may be a positive impact of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Tribal identity, civic dislocation, and environmental health research
Elizabeth Hoover

This chapter explores the experience of the Mohawk community of Akwesasne, a Native American tribe who set out to determine the extent to which a local contaminated site was impacting community health. Akwesasne community members reached out to a research university, eventually partnering on the first large-scale environmental health community-based participatory research project (CBPR) to be conducted in a tribal community. Based on interviews with scientists, community fieldworkers, and study participants, this chapter examines the ways in which collaborating on these studies was beneficial for all parties – especially in the context of citizen science goals of education and capacity building – as well as the challenges they faced, including communicating the limits of what scientific studies could accomplish for the community. Hoover also explores how the binaries between citizen and scientist, between subject and researcher were blurred during this research process, through creating a “third space of sovereignty.” This case study in CBPR and citizen science also leads us to intentionally consider the social, cultural, and political processes that structure research in an Indigenous community, and calls on us to question what we mean by the “citizen” in citizen science.

in Toxic truths
Crystal Tremblay
and
Sarah Amyot

Brazil), while promoting environmental sustainability and inclusive public policies on integrated waste management. The project recognizes the immense potential in the work of recyclers to improve environmental health, assist in the recovery of resources and, through capacity building and participatory processes, to empower recyclers to contribute to public policy, environmental and social change. Project partners recognized that, when working individually, recyclers were forced to sell their product through middlemen who buy at very low prices and then resell to

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Mandakini Pant

them to function in public space with determination. Institutionalized gender-based inequalities and pressures disempower them. Training interventions, besides orienting them to governance procedures and programmes and imparting requisite functional skills, should also underscore the importance of gender sensitization. A gender transformative capacity-building approach would contribute towards building gender-sensitive institutions where both women- and men-elected representatives, despite their different needs, priorities and aspirations, contribute to development

in Knowledge, democracy and action
A global perspective
Nirmala Lall

exclusion, and enhanced equality. (2008, p. 6) A combination of participatory approaches referred to as mixed methods have been used strategically and effectively to combine the strengths of capacity building and knowledge mobilization in this policy-relevant project. Interviews, focus groups, surveys, photovoice, participatory video, community mapping and participatory observation (researchers participate in the work processes of the recyclers) were among the mixed-methods approach used to engage recyclers as co-researchers and participants. Capacity building focused on

in Knowledge, democracy and action
Open Access (free)
The potential and limits of EU development cooperation policy
Karin Arts
and
Anna K. Dickson

Karin Arts and Anna K. Dickson to maximise the impact of development policy by identifying priorities for action and concentrating Community action in a limited number of spheres in which the Community provides value added. The principal aim of development policy is now to reduce, and eventually to eliminate, poverty and to this end there will be new emphasis on pro-poor policies. The Council, Parliament and Commission have agreed to focus on six main areas: trade, regional cooperation, macroeconomic support, transport, food security and capacity building, especially

in EU development cooperation
Science shops and policy development
Eileen Martin
,
Emma McKenna
,
Henk Mulder
, and
Norbert Steinhaus

and 2005, Dutch science shops utilized key policy drivers, around renewal of higher education and capacity building on environmental issues, to make the case to the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs to fund a network of science shops focused on environmental issues in Romania. The resulting InterMEDIU centres at universities were seen as important steps in the renewal of higher education, and instrumental in capacity building to tackle environmental issues with domestic resources. As science shops gained momentum through international networking and national

in Knowledge, democracy and action