Open Access (free)
Editor: Paul Grainge

As a technology able to picture and embody the temporality of the past, cinema has become central to the mediation of memory in modern cultural life. The memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This book is a sustained, interdisciplinary perspective on memory and film from early cinema to the present. The first section examines the relationship between official and popular history and the constitution of memory narratives in and around the production and consumption of American cinema. The second section examines the politics of memory in a series of chapters that take as their focus three pivotal sites of national conflict in postwar America. This includes the war in Vietnam, American race relations and the Civil Rights Movement, and the history of marginality in the geographic and cultural borderlands of the US. The book explores the articulation of Vietnam. The final section concentrates on the issue of mediation; it explores how technological and semiotic shifts in the cultural terrain have influenced the coding and experience of memory in contemporary cinema. It considers both the presence of music and colour in nostalgia films of the 1990s and the impact of digital and video technologies on the representational determinants of mediated memory. The book also examines the stakes of cultural remembering in the United States and the means by which memory has been figured through Hollywood cinema.

Open Access (free)
Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

this book. While personality and personal history affect the content, intensity and emotional tone of a memory, the social and cultural context of memory also exerts a substantial influence on its form and experience. This chapter explores formations of memory in a contemporary British context, specifically as it relates to memories of cinema-going that have been reproduced in local newspapers. Based on

in Memory and popular film
Mike Huggins

’s Inspectors of Schools felt in 1924 that such reports were exaggerated.2 HMI were in no position to know. Pupils were unlikely to boast to an unknown, middle-class visiting school inspector of their involvement in illegal gambling. Betting was probably exceeded only by cinema-going as the leading leisure spending activity during the interwar years.3 The 1853 Betting Houses Act and 1906 Street Betting Act had both assumed that the perceived ‘problem’ of working-class cash betting could be substantially reduced by prohibition and police action. They were wrong. Enforcement

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

form of commercial reruns, generic recycling, critical retrospectives or popular reminiscence, the memory of film scenes and movies screens, cinema and cinema-going, has become integral to the placement and location of film within the cultural imagination of this century and the last. This volume uses memory as a specific framework for the study of popular film, intervening in growing debates about the status and function of

in Memory and popular film
Screening Victoria
Steven Fielding

Paul, 1987 ), p. 39. 33 John Sedgwick, ‘Cinema-going preferences in Britain in the 1930s’, in Jeffrey Richards (ed.), The Unknown 1930s. An Alternative History of the British Cinema, 1929–1939 (London: I.B.Tauris, 1998 ), pp. 30 and 34; J. Poole, ‘British cinema attendance in wartime: audience preference

in The British monarchy on screen
Ian Mackillop and Neil Sinyard

recovering something of the quality of the whole cinema-going experience in the 1950s, which, memory tells us, is so different from our present multiplex days. (As Terence Davies’s films lovingly show, there was still a magic and an innocence attached to the cinema in those days, which one can rediscover in reading through fan magazines and old film annuals: a reader wins 10 s 6 d from Picturegoer for observing that ‘no screen

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Serious Charge and film censorship
Tony Aldgate

I N MAY 1950 the Wheare Committee recommended that a new ‘X’ category be introduced and applied to films intended for exhibition to ‘adults only’. By January 1951, the British Board of Film Censors (BBFC) agreed to the implementation of an ‘X’ certificate which limited the cinema-going audience to those over 16 years of age. ‘It is our desire’, said the BBFC secretary

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Mike Huggins

way, the perception that cash betting was illegal as part of a class conspiracy, and the homogeneity of cash betting patterns in particular areas, must have helped to unify skilled and unskilled working-class groups, and aided the broader process of working-class formation and solidarity. Yet many historians still neglect the centrality of betting and gambling to much interwar leisure. For example, recent revisionist attempts to demonstrate that a modern ‘teenage’ culture already existed between the wars stressed their leisure activities such as cinema-going but

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
Open Access (free)
The Admirable Crichton and Look Back in Anger
Stephen Lacey

door of the box set/studio out into the world beyond, is usually considered stagey and too reliant on the limitations of the time/space conventions of theatre. However, criticism of theatricality in cinema goes beyond this. To be ‘theatrical’ on the screen might mean (in no particular order) all or some of the following attributes. It often suggests an over-reliance on the ‘word’, the residue of the

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

fraction of the cinema-going audience and already subject to powerful mechanisms of assimilation, perfectly filled the role of the non-white other whose negative representation conferred whiteness upon the majority of the series’ viewers. The remainder of this chapter looks in more detail at the Chronicles ’ representation of Native Americans, briefly delineating the contemporary political situation that

in Memory and popular film