Patrick Doyle

vision for the IAOS that saw people of all political and religious stripes united behind a project to promote ‘the welfare of the agricultural classes’. Plunkett's appeal for cross-societal support to spread the principle of co-operation stood out in a context of fractious debates about what direction Ireland's political future should take. As someone who studied the condition of Irish agriculture, Plunkett concluded that farmers worked within an exploitative system. Farmers bought too dear and sold too cheap; transport costs remained too high; inadequate credit

in Civilising rural Ireland
Patrick Doyle

. The outbreak of the war led to a rapid increase in the output of agricultural produce in the British economy. 16 Food supply formed a major concern of British governance in wartime and Irish agriculture remained a central plank to Britain's economic performance. The IAOS pleaded with the DATI to co-ordinate their work for the sake of the war effort and to put ‘an end to all friction between the official and voluntary agencies working for agricultural development in Ireland and insuring their harmonious co-operation’. 17 The DATI and IAOS initially presented a

in Civilising rural Ireland
Open Access (free)
The co-operative movement, development and the nation-state, 1889–1939
Author: Patrick Doyle

Civilising Rural Ireland examines how modern Ireland emerged out of the social and economic transformation prompted by the rural co-operative movement. The movement emerged in response to systemic economic problems that arose throughout the nineteenth century and coincided with a wide-ranging project of cultural nationalism. Within a short space of time the co-operative movement established a swathe of creameries, agricultural societies and credit societies, leading to a radical reorganisation of rural Ireland and helping to create a distinctive Irish political economy. The work of overlooked co-operative experts is critically examined for the first time and reinserted into the process of state development. The interventions of these organisers, intellectuals and farmers built up key institutions that shaped everyday life across rural communities. The movement weathered war and revolution, to become an indispensable part of an Irish state infrastructure after independence in 1922. The strained relationship and economic rivalry that developed between Irish and British co-operators is also explored in order to illuminate the changing relationship between Ireland and the United Kingdom from an economic perspective. Civilising Rural Ireland will appeal to a wide audience interested in modern Irish history and readers are introduced to an eclectic range of personalities who shared an interest in co-operation and whose actions possessed important consequences for the way Ireland developed. The creative use of local and national sources, many of which are examined for the first time, mean the book offers a new perspective on an important period in the making of modern Ireland.

Open Access (free)
The European Union and its member states

This book takes up traditional approaches to political science. It aims to offer a mixture of conventional and specific analyses and insights for different groups of readers. In view of the European Union's multi-level and multi-actor polity, the book highlights the complex procedural and institutional set-up of nation states preparing and implementing decisions made by the institutions of the European Community (EC). In looking at the emerging and evolving realities of the European polity, it shows how European institutions and Member States (re-)act and interact in a new institutional and procedural set-up. It explores how governmental and non-governmental actors in different national settings adapt to common challenges, constraints and opportunities for which they are mainly themselves responsible. The book discusses the Belgian policy toward European integration as a significant demonstration of its commitment to multilateralism and international co-operation in security and economic affairs. Attitudes to European integration in Denmark, Germany, Finland, Greece, and Spain are discussed. Tendencies towards 'Europeanisation' and 'sectoralisation' of the ministerial administration during the process of European integration and the typical administrative pluralism of the Italian political system seem to have mutually reinforced each other. Strong multi-level players are able to increase their access and influence at both levels and to use their position on one level for strengthening their say on the other. German and Belgian regions might develop into these kinds of actors. A persistent trend during the 1990s is traced towards stronger national performers, particularly in terms of adaptations and reactions to Maastricht Treaty.

A Model for Historical Reflection in the Humanitarian Sector
Kevin O’Sullivan and Réiseal Ní Chéilleachair

the entire event. Our experience indicates that the value of hosting discussions at a university or research institute lies in taking participants away from environments in which protecting organisational brands and concerns over access to funding restrict conversation and co-operation. That is not to suggest that university campuses represent ideal territories for debate; they require careful consideration of the same issues of accessibility (physical

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Governing Precarity through Adaptive Design
Mark Duffield

Development Co-operations Lens on Terrorism Prevention: Key Entry Points for Action’ ( London : British Overseas NGOs for Development (BOND) ). Braidotti , R. ( 2013 ), The Posthuman ( Cambridge : Polity Press ). Brenner , R. ( 2006 ), The Economics of Global Turbulance: The Advanced Capitalist Economies from Long Boom to Long Downturn, 1945–2005 ( London and New York : Verso ). Brown , N. ( 2018 ) ‘ Postmodernity, Not Yet: Towards a New Periodisation ’, Radical Philosophy , 2 : 1 , 11

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Patrick Doyle

sphere of economics and social organisation. The mundane rhythms and experiences of everyday life also played a crucial part in this process. The practice of co-operation between citizens mattered as much as the effects of conflict. Through the gradual assimilation of its network of co-operative businesses built around creameries, credit societies and other forms of association, the IAOS helped to create a modern agrarian state. Many rivals contested the extension of co-operative businesses, but by the outbreak of the First World War, these

in Civilising rural Ireland
Open Access (free)
Patrick Doyle

Co-operation is a complex thing. Whether between individuals, organisations or nation-states an ability to co-operate is a crucial part of any successful relationship. An inability to co-operate often leads to a downturn in relationships with potential drastic consequences. Today, the promotion of co-operatives is one of the most effective tools used by international policymakers to stimulate economic development. 2 Yet, despite the apparent commitment to co-operatives that exists at the highest levels of global politics there remains a

in Civilising rural Ireland
Open Access (free)
Europe’s ‘zero hour’
Kjell M. Torbiörn

new situation also offered a unique opportunity for reconciliation and budding co-operation especially between Germany and France, whose rivalry had underlain both world wars. The Marshall Plan launched by the United States in 1948 kick-started economic recovery and co-operation in Western Europe, permitting democracy and a market economy to take hold. In Central and Eastern Europe, however, the Soviet political grip hardened and communist regimes posing as ‘people’s democracies’ were installed, emphasising state ownership of the means of production and central

in Destination Europe
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts
Markku Hokkanen

–16, at p. 107. For a comparable case of co-operation during the plague emergency in Accra, see Ryan Johnson, ‘ Mantsemei , Interpreters and the Successful Eradication of Plague: The 1908 Plague Epidemic in Colonial Accra’, in Ryan Johnson and Amna Khalid (eds.), Public Health in the British Empire: Intermediaries, Subordinates, and the Practice of Public Health, 1850

in Beyond the state