The Visual Politics and Narratives of Red Cross Museums in Europe and the United States, 1920s to 2010s
Sönke Kunkel

Introduction This essay discusses Red Cross museums as a medium of humanitarian communication. A long-neglected theme in public history and the historiography of humanitarianism, Red Cross museums today are vital agents in the movement’s work to communicate the values, missions, and historical achievements of Red Cross societies around the world. Local publics find those museums in the United States, the UK, or Germany – which has more than a

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Mel Bunce

basic concepts about critical thinking vastly outperformed the control group at a series of scenario-based tests. They were more likely to reject arguments based on anecdote and raise doubts about health cures that had not been scientifically tested. Finally, news outlets and NGOs need to commit to accurate reporting and campaigning. There can be a strong temptation for journalists and communication teams to provide exaggerated or sensationalist accounts. This content can come from a good place – it reflects a utilitarian ethic in which

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Antonia Lucia Dawes

encountering an ever-increasing complexity of human movement, global heterogeneity and attendant racist responses. In order to examine this more closely, the chapter connects histories of culture and communication in the city to the contemporary, multilingual dynamics of the ever-evolving street markets where I did my fieldwork. This is, of necessity, a selective account that considers social and political histories of the city as they relate to the question of talk and language use. Unification and colonialism: forging an Italian language and people Antonio Gramsci

in Race talk
An Interview with Rainer Schlösser, Spokesperson of the Association of the Red Cross Museums in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der deutschen Rotkreuz-Museen)
Sönke Kunkel

should mention that the museum is also a collecting institution. That’s something that many people tend to overlook: as a museum, we collect, store, and archive parts of the material and written record of the Red Cross. So we also have a library which serves researchers. SK: Ah, that’s interesting. So you’re involved in a wide spectrum of activities. Still I am wondering somewhat about, let’s say, the general significance of the institution of the Red Cross museum. Isn’t there something old-fashioned and outdated about museums in this world of online communication

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Leslie Haddon

10 Information and communication technologies and the role of consumers in innovation Leslie Haddon As a contribution to current discussions of the role of both actual consumers and representations of consumers in the innovation process, this chapter considers two empirical studies of the information and communication technology (ICT) industries. It asks: 1 To what extent, how and when are consumers (i.e. potential end users) considered or involved during the design of new products? 2 When consumers are actually involved in the process of innovation, what is the

in Innovation by demand
Open Access (free)
Valérie Gorin
and
Sönke Kunkel

humanitarian communication, and you get a different picture: here, history is everywhere. No website of any major humanitarian organization comes along without its own history section. On YouTube, humanitarian players provide an ever growing number of documentaries about their past and origins. Fundraising campaigns, mass mailings, and social media posts all point frequently to historical achievements. Major aid organizations now also call on their branches to ‘enhance the historical and cultural

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Andrea Ballabeni
and
Davide Danovi

9 Advocating a radical change in policies and new models to secure freedom and efficiency in funding and communication of science1 Andrea Ballabeni and Davide Danovi A moving landscape Threats and obstructions to scientific freedom, fairness and efficiency are commonly perceived as surrounding the scientific world. However, bottlenecks can also occur from within the system itself as some of the current regulations and forces shaping research (referred to here as ‘science policies’) substantially decrease the freedom and motivation of scientists. Indeed

in The freedom of scientific research
Open Access (free)
Laughing and Grinning through “Sonny’s Blues”
James Nikopoulos

The protagonists in James Baldwin’s 1957 short story “Sonny’s Blues” are constantly smiling and laughing. The story’s narrator notices these gestures and utilizes them to grasp at clarity when clarity seems out of reach. This article examines the narrator’s focus on this duo of facial expressions which reliably denote positive emotion. The relationship we maintain between our smiles and our laughter structures many of the narrator’s interactions with the story’s hero. More though, this relationship between smiles, laughter, and a kind of joy resembles the relationship Baldwin has described between the blues and the world this genre of music depicts.

James Baldwin Review
Brendan T. Lawson

Humanitarian Operations and Supply Chain Management (HOSCM). This body of work, generally geared towards the development of practical solutions to humanitarian logistical problems, has increasingly adopted mathematical models over the past two decades. These have been used to understand the uncertainty surrounding several key areas in supply and operations: communication systems, infrastructure requirements, resource management, severity and time of the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Focus on Community Engagement
Frédéric Le Marcis
,
Luisa Enria
,
Sharon Abramowitz
,
Almudena-Mari Saez
, and
Sylvain Landry B. Faye

, present three community engagement encounters representative of practices regularly implemented to gain communities’ trust and stem potential resistance to epidemic control measures: communication through elders and youths in Guinea; engagement with NGO-affiliated community leadership structures in Liberia; indirect mediation to chiefs in Sierra Leone. Inspired by the extended-case-study method developed by the Manchester School ( Gluckman, 1940 ), we illuminate our ethnography by paying

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs