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Open Access (free)
From policy to law to regulation

This book explains the beginnings of net neutrality regulation in the United States and Europe, and some of the current debate over access to Specialised Services: fast lanes with higher Quality of Service (QoS). It examines the new European law of 2015 and the interaction between that law and interception/privacy. The book takes a deep dive into UK self- and co-regulation of net neutrality. In each of the national case studies, initial confusion at lack of clarity in net neutrality laws gave way to significant cases, particularly since 2014, which have given regulators the opportunity to clarify their legislation or regulation. The majority of such cases relate to mobile net neutrality, and in particular so-called 'zero rating' practices. The book compares results and proposes a regulatory toolkit for those jurisdictions that intend effective practical partial or complete implementation of net neutrality. It sets out a future research agenda for exploring implementation of regulation. The book outlines competition policy's purpose, referring to the exceptionally rigorous recent analysis of competition law suitability to regulate net neutrality by Maniadaki. Having analysed regulatory tools with little chance of success, it then examines what communications regulators actually do: regulating telecoms access based on the UK case study. The book considers whether zero rating poses a serious challenge to Open Internet use. It explores some of the wider international problems of regulating the newest manifestation of discrimination: zero rating. The book also considers the various means by which government can regulate net neutrality.

analysis of competition law suitability to regulate net neutrality by Maniadaki. Having analysed regulatory tools with little chance of success, I then examine what communications regulators actually do: regulating telecoms access based on the UK case study. This provides insights into how difficult net neutrality regulation will prove in practice, a subject to which we return in Chapter 6 and the concluding Chapter 8 . I then

in Network neutrality

in 2002. The BEREC role resulted from the political compromise that, instead of the federal European communications regulator longed for by Commissioners since Martin Bangemann in 1997, there should be a coordinatory club of national regulators. 49 There now 37 members of the IRG, comprising the 28 BEREC members, 4 EFTA (European Free Trade Association)/EEA (European Economic

in Network neutrality
Towards Specialised Services?

Internet will have a significant impact on their ability to enter new markets. Baseline access could be protected by ‘network neutrality’ rules from communications regulators in the US, EU, and elsewhere. IoT users with very high bandwidth or reliability requirements may be affected by neutrality rules that limit the ability of telecommunications companies to

in Network neutrality
Open Access (free)

‘Regulators’ regulators’ forum in Barcelona on 2–3 July 2015, when no less than ten national regulators explained their approaches to net neutrality. 13 BEREC met with EaPeReg (Eastern Partnership Electronic Communications Regulators Network), REGULATEL (Latin American Forum of Telecommunications Regulators) and EMERG (Euro-Mediterranean Regulators Group) for the high-level Regulator Summit, representing

in Network neutrality

the competition perspective with no intervention until harm is proved, wherever possible, and a ‘light touch’ in regulatory matters, based on the initial principles established by Lord Currie, its first chair, and its chief executive from 2006 to 2014, Ed Richards. In the hiatus between the decision to create a new ‘converged’ communications regulator in 2001 and the actual

in Network neutrality