Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

incorporated into intra-vaginal rings that not only incorporate sensors but also can potentially deliver interventions against infectious agents and vaccines. The application of wearable technology to infectious disease in manifold spanning surveillance through treatment. ( Levine, 2017 : 89) 9 Taken together, these suggestions – that users should wear tracking devices (including as a form of remotely controlled contraception: see Lee, 2014 ) that could be tools for

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Sex, family planning and British female doctors in transnational perspective, 1920–70

Women’s medicine explores the key role played by British female doctors in the production and circulation of contraceptive knowledge and the handling of sexual disorders between the 1920s and 1970s at the transnational level, taking France as a point of comparison. This study follows the path of a set of women doctors as they made their way through the predominantly male-dominated medical landscape in establishing birth control and family planning as legitimate fields of medicine. This journey encompasses their practical engagement with birth control and later family planning clinics in Britain, their participation in the development of the international movement of birth control and family planning and their influence on French doctors. Drawing on a wide range of archived and published medical materials, this study sheds light on the strategies British female doctors used, and the alliances they made, to put forward their medical agenda and position themselves as experts and leaders in birth control and family planning research and practice.

Caroline Rusterholz

[W]omen clients came to us because we were all women. Women doctors, women nurses, women running clinics. 1 Helena Wright From the opening of birth control clinics in the early 1920s to the Family Planning Act in 1967, women have been central actors in the campaign for birth control and contraception in Britain

in Women’s medicine
Open Access (free)
Caroline Rusterholz

to provide birth control to all women, married or single; in the same year, the Abortion Act legalised abortion by registered practitioners in Britain. On the other side of the channel, French authorities revoked the 1920 law and authorised the provision of contraceptives. In 1974, contraception became free under the NHS in Britain. These new laws were the culmination of long battles fought by British women doctors in Britain, and indirectly in France. But they nevertheless opened up a new front on struggles for control of female bodies that would later be

in Women’s medicine
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

, involuntary sterilisation,7 maternal health and access to emergency contraception.8 On abortion, the form that will open the second part of the anamnesis, feminists and feminist lawyers have written extensively.9 In this book I will demonstrate, referring to several judgments, decisions and reports, that restrictive abortion laws cause violence to women, who suffer from depression, stress and physical injuries as a consequence of denial or limits to access to the practice by 23 DE VIDO 9781526124975 PRINT.indd 23 24/03/2020 11:01 Violence against women’s health in

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Jolien Gijbels and Kaat Wils

moralising sexualised discourse regarding birth planning. Different from other countries, Belgian gynaecologists, such as the Leuven professor Rufin Schockaert, undertook a leading role in promoting a Catholic vision on sexuality. According to this vision, reproduction was the sole purpose of marriage, implying the condemnation of birth control and contraception (see Chapter 2

in Medical histories of Belgium
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Caroline Rusterholz

World War, this international campaign for birth control spawned the International Planned Parenthood Federation, in which contraception was formally established as a medical issue. In the reactivation of this movement, British women doctors assumed prominence, along with their Swedish, American and Dutch colleagues. Drawing on the proceedings of international conferences on contraception and family planning; the archives of the Medical Women's Federation, the Family Planning Association, and the Mouvement Français pour le Planning Familial; and female doctors

in Women’s medicine
Open Access (free)
Caroline Rusterholz

In ‘One Woman's Mission’, an article in the Sunday Times Magazine in 1973, pioneer birth control activist and female gynaecologist Helena Wright recalled the pivotal moment in her career. In 1928, Wright intrepidly dedicated herself to making contraception both acceptable and accessible. Looking back on this decision, she explained: ‘It seemed to me in a prophetic way, that birth control was the single subject that women doctors had to get hold of.’  1 The implications of Wright's vision for

in Women’s medicine
A British–French comparison
Caroline Rusterholz

During the interwar years, women doctors medicalised birth control in Britain by developing a number of strategies to position themselves as experts in contraception and sexual disorders. 1 Among these strategies were publication of medical articles on birth control and participation in medical conferences. Yet these forms of dissemination of medical knowledge were not restricted to the national sphere; British women doctors also took part in international conferences on birth control. In fact

in Women’s medicine